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Astronomy

Faculty of the Department of Astronomy

Abraham Loeb, Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of Science (Chair)
Charles Alcock, Professor of Astronomy
Edo Berger, Professor of Astronomy (Director of Undergraduate Studies)
David Charbonneau, Professor of Astronomy
Charles Conroy, Assistant Professor of Astronomy
Daniel James Eisenstein, Professor of Astronomy
Douglas Finkbeiner, Professor of Astronomy and of Physics (on leave 2014-15)
Alyssa Goodman, Professor of Astronomy
Jonathan E. Grindlay, Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy
Lars Hernquist, Mallinckrodt Professor of Astrophysics
John Asher Johnson, Professor of Astronomy (Director of Graduate Studies)
Robert P. Kirshner, Clowes Professor of Science
John M. Kovac, Associate Professor of Astronomy
James M. Moran, Donald H. Menzel Professor of Astrophysics (on leave 2014-15)
Ramesh Narayan, Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences
Karin Oberg, Assistant Professor of Astronomy
Dimitar D. Sasselov, Phillips Professor of Astronomy
Irwin I. Shapiro, Timken University Professor
Alicia M. Soderberg, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Astronomy (on leave fall term)
Christopher Stubbs, Samuel C. Moncher Professor of Physics and of Astronomy, Harvard College Professor (on leave 2014-15)

Other Faculty Offering Instruction in the Department of Astronomy

Sean M. Andrews, Lecturer on Astronomy
Steven Robert Cranmer, Lecturer on Astronomy
Thomas M. Dame, Lecturer on Astronomy
Rosanne Di Stefano, Lecturer on Astronomy
Giovanni G. Fazio, Lecturer on Astronomy
Christine Jones Forman, Lecturer on Astronomy
William R. Forman, Lecturer on Astronomy
Matthew Holman, Lecturer on Astronomy
Justin C. Kasper, Lecturer on Astronomy
Charles J. Lada, Lecturer on Astronomy
David W. Latham, Lecturer on Astronomy
Jeffrey E. McClintock, Lecturer on Astronomy
Philip M. Sadler, Frances W. Wright Senior Lecturer on Celestial Navigation and Astronomy
Howard A. Smith, Lecturer on Astronomy
Andrew Szentgyorgyi, Lecturer on Astronomy
Alexey A. Vikhlinin, Lecturer on Astronomy
David J. Wilner, Lecturer on Astronomy

Affiliates of the Department of Astronomy

Ruth Ann Murray-Clay, Lecturer on Astronomy

Primarily for Undergraduates

Astronomy 16 provides an introduction to stellar and planetary astrophysics, and Astronomy 17 provides an introduction to galactic and extragalactic astrophysics. Both courses use single-variable calculus and some introductory mechanics. Together these two courses, which may be taken in either order, provide a complete introductory survey of astrophysics. Astronomy 16 and 17 form the foundation for both the secondary field and the concentration in astrophysics. Both courses receive Gen Ed credit. Students interested in an introduction to the methods of observational astrophysics are encouraged to consider Astronomy 100, which includes a trip to use the telescopes located at the F. L. Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Astronomy 98 is a research tutorial intended for students pursuing the astrophysics concentration or secondary field, although this course is open in special cases to concentrators in related fields. Students interested in substantial independent research during their senior year should consider Astronomy 99, leading to the senior thesis. Astronomy 110, 120, 130, 151, 191, and 193 each offer the opportunity for study of a particular field of astrophysics. Each of these courses requires preparation in mathematics and physics. Students interested in an introduction to astronomy that presumes no mathematical preparation above the level of high school algebra should consider SPU 19, SPU 21, SPU 22, SPU 30, and Astronomy 2. These courses use a variety of approaches aimed at introducing the key concepts that address some of the great questions of astronomy.

Astronomy 2. Celestial Navigation
Catalog Number: 2179 Enrollment: Limited to 30.
Philip M. Sadler
Half course (fall term). Tu., 11:30-1:30, Tu., 7-10 pm. EXAM GROUP: 16
Never be lost again! Find your way on sea, land, or air by employing celestial and terrestrial techniques. Acquire expertise in using navigators’ tools (sextant, compass, and charts) while learning the steps to the celestial dance of the sun, moon, stars, and planets. This 108-year-old course continues to rely on practical skills and collaborative problem-solving, while utilizing historical artifacts (instruments, maps, captains’ logs) and student-built devices. Culminating in a day-long cruise to practice navigation skills.
Note: Minimal lecturing; predominantly practical activities with individual attention from teaching staff. Math beyond high school trigonometry and geometry unnecessary. This course is offered each year.

Astronomy 16. Stellar and Planetary Astronomy
Catalog Number: 8813
John Asher Johnson
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 2:30–4. EXAM GROUP: 11
This course provides an introduction to the physical principles describing the formation and evolution of stars and their planetary companions. Topics include thermal radiation and stellar spectra; telescopes; energy generation in stars; stellar evolution; orbital dynamics; the Solar system; and exoplanets. This course includes an observational component: students will determine the distance to the Sun, and use the Clay Telescope atop the Science Center to study stellar evolution and detect exoplanets.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of the Physical Universe. This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in mechanics, which may be taken concurrently, satisfied by Physics 11a, Physics 15a, Physics 16 or Physical Sciences 12a.

Astronomy 17. Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy
Catalog Number: 22304
Daniel James Eisenstein
Half course (fall term). M., W., 2:30–4; . EXAM GROUP: 7
This course provides an introduction to the physical principles describing galaxies and the composition and evolution of the Universe. Topics include the interstellar medium; star clusters; the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way; other galaxies; clusters of galaxies; active galaxies and quasars; cosmology; and the early universe. This course includes an observational component: In addition to observing galaxies with the Science Center Clay Telescope, students will use the millimeter-wavelength telescope at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics to measure the rotation velocity of the Milky Way galaxy and to determine its mass.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of the Physical Universe. This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in mechanics, which may be taken concurrently, satisfied by Physics lla, Physics 15a, Physics 16, or Physical Sciences 12a.

*Astronomy 91r. Supervised Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 1545
Abraham Loeb and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 14
Supervised reading and research in a subject of astrophysics that is not normally included in the regular course offerings of the department.
Note: Students must arrange for course supervision with an individual member of the Department. The course may be counted only once toward the concentration requirements, and may not be taken more than twice. This course is offered each semester.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16 or Astronomy 17.

*Astronomy 98. Research Tutorial in Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 3121
Charles Conroy, and members of the Department
Half course (fall term). M., 2:30–4, W., 12:30–2. EXAM GROUP: 7
This tutorial introduces students to research at the forefront of astrophysics, and provides opportunities for students to meet with research scientists and individuals active in science policy, education, and journalism. Students meet weekly for a lecture and discussion over dinner with a guest speaker, preceded by a reading and a preparatory seminar. Students will be mentored throughout the term on a research project of their choosing. The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is home to one of the largest groups of astronomers in the world, providing extensive opportunities for undergraduate research.
Note: Open to students pursuing the concentration or secondary field in astrophysics, and in special cases to concentrators in other physical sciences. This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16 or Astronomy 17.

*Astronomy 99. Senior Thesis in Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 5413
Charles Alcock
Full course. Tu., at 3. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 2; Spring: 16
Individually supervised reading and research leading to the senior thesis. The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is home to one of the largest groups of astronomers in the world, providing extensive opportunities for undergraduate research.
Note: This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 98.

Cross-listed Courses

Earth and Planetary Sciences 52. Introduction to Global Geophysics
[Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning 19. The Art of Numbers]
Science of the Physical Universe 19. The Energetic Universe
Science of the Physical Universe 21. Stellar Understanding of the Cosmos
Science of the Physical Universe 22. The Unity of Science: From the Big Bang to the Brontosaurus and Beyond
Science of the Physical Universe 30. Life as a Planetary Phenomenon

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Astronomy 100. Methods of Observational Astronomy
Catalog Number: 95134
Edo Berger
Half course (spring term). W., 12–2; F., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7
In this course we will learn the basic tools of modern astronomical research, including telescopes, detectors, imaging, spectroscopy, and common software. Emphasis will be placed on both the theory behind telescopes and their use, and hands-on experience with real data. Using this basic knowledge we will analyze science-level astronomical data from a wide range of telescopes and review the basic properties of stars, galaxies, and other astronomical objects of interest. The course includes a trip to the F. L. Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, to gather data with various telescopes.
Note: This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16 or Astronomy 17.

Astronomy 120. Stellar Physics
Catalog Number: 58719
Alicia M. Soderberg
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30–1. EXAM GROUP: 15
Stars are the basic building blocks of galaxies and are responsible for the nucleosynthesis of most of the elements. Topics include stellar structure; energy transport in stars; stellar atmospheres; astroseismology; nuclear fusion in stars; stellar evolution; nucleosynthesis of the elements; stellar death and supernovae; the degenerate remnants of stars; black holes. This course will make use of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics, but will review these subjects as necessary.
Note: Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16. Physics 15c strongly recommended.

[Astronomy 130. Cosmology]
Catalog Number: 73826
Douglas Finkbeiner
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 2–3:30.
The physical model describing the initial conditions, evolution, and ultimate fate of the Universe. Topics include cosmic dynamics; the Robertson-Walker Metric; curvature; estimating cosmological parameters; the accelerating universe; dark matter; gravitational lensing; the cosmic microwave background; nucleosynthesis; inflation and the very early universe; formation of structure. Note: Offered in alternate years.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 17 or Physics 15c.

[Astronomy 151. Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics]
Catalog Number: 3025
Lars Hernquist
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 9.
Fluid and gas dynamics with applications drawn from astrophysical phenomena. Topics include: kinetic theory, diffusive effects, incompressible fluids, inviscid and viscous flows, boundary layer theory, accretion disks, fluid instabilities, turbulence, convection, gas dynamics, linear (sound) waves, method of characteristics, Riemann invariants, supersonic flow, non-linear waves, shocks, similarity solutions, blast waves, radiative shocks, ionization fronts, magnetohygrodynamics, hydromagnetic shocks, dynamos, gravitational collapse, principles of plasma physics, Landau damping, computational approaches, stability criteria, particle based (Lagrangian) methods, adaptive mesh refinement, radiation hydrodynamics.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered alternate years.

[Astronomy 185. Orders of Magnitude] - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 72213
Instructor to be determined
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1:30–3.
This course offers an introduction to order-of-magnitude estimation, as applied to astrophysical systems. Emphasis will be placed on research triage---how to decide which theoretical and observational ideas merit in depth exploration. Example topics include diffusion and viscosity; material properties; gas drag; collisional dynamics; radiative and non-radiative cooling mechanisms; the structure of astrophysical disks; and turbulence.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Notes: This course is open to undergraduates, but familiarity with a broad range of physical topics at the level of incoming graduate students will be assumed.

Astronomy 189. Exoplanet Systems
Catalog Number: 92184 Enrollment:
David Charbonneau
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 5
A survey of the rapidly evolving field of exoplanets with the goal of equipping students with the ability to identify and pursue research questions. Topics include observational methods and instrumentation to detect and characterize exoplanets; properties of stellar hosts; formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems; composition and physical structure of planets; planetary atmospheres; habitable zones and biosignatures.
Note: This course is intended for graduate students and upper division undergraduates concentrating in astrophysics or related fields. Students who do not have a CfA computer account should contact the course head well in advance of the first day of class. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16, and a course in mechanics at the level of Physics 15a or above.

Astronomy 191. Astrophysics Laboratory
Catalog Number: 3615
John M. Kovac
Half course (spring term). F., 2-5, and lab hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 18
Laboratory and observational projects in astrophysics. Students design and undertake two projects from a selection including: observational studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation, molecules in interstellar clouds, the rotation of the galaxy, galactic molecular sources with the submillimeter array (SMA), stars and clusters with the Clay Telescope; and laboratory experiments including super-conducting submillimeter detectors, x-ray CCDs, and hard x-ray imaging detectors and telescopes.
Note: Primarily for concentrators in astrophysics or combined concentrators with physics. Students with physics as their primary concentration, but with a serious interest in astrophysics, may take this to satisfy their laboratory requirement (in lieu of Physics 191) upon petition to the Head Tutor in Physics. This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 16 or 17, or Physics 15c or equivalent.

Astronomy 193. Noise and Data Analysis in Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 4495
Aneta Siemiginowska & Vinay Kashyap
Half course (spring term). M., W., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 18
Introduction to Astronomical data and analysis with a view to obtaining reliable inferences. Includes the basics of signal processing like Fourier Transforms and wavelets, non-parametric tests, and stochastic processes. Covers basic Bayesian analysis, starting from probability theory, model fitting and selection, parameter estimation, and MCMC. Also covers image processing, including filtering, deconvolution, adaptive smoothing, and source detection.
Note: This course offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21b or equivalent.

Cross-listed Courses

Applied Mathematics 111. Introduction to Scientific Computing
[Earth and Planetary Sciences 121. Terrestrial Planets]
Earth and Planetary Sciences 161. Planetary Physics and Global Tectonics
*Physics 191r. Advanced Laboratory

Primarily for Graduates

These courses are primarily aimed at graduate students in Astronomy, although properly prepared undergraduates and graduate students from other fields are welcome. All graduate students in Astronomy are required to take Astronomy 200 and to register every year for Astronomy 301hf. Other 200 level courses below, along with Astronomy 151, 189 and 193 above, may be taken as graduate electives. Graduate students in Astronomy are required to take one 200 level Physics-based course selected from Physics 210, 251a and Astronomy 251. Other 200 level Physics courses may be substituted upon petition to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Astronomy 200 (formerly Astronomy 150). Radiative Processes in Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 8993
Ramesh Narayan
Half course (fall term). M., W., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 1
This course offers a survey of radiative processes of astrophysical importance from radio waves to gamma rays. Topics include thermal and non-thermal processes, including bremsstrahlung, synchrotron radiation, and Compton scattering; radiation in plasmas; atomic and molecular spectra.
Note: Open to seniors concentrating in Astrophysics or Physics. Juniors considering this course should contact the instructor. This course is offered each year.
Prerequisite: Physics 143a.

Astronomy 201a. Stellar Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 4303
Steven Robert Cranmer
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 2:30–4. EXAM GROUP: 14
Stars are the basic building blocks of the universe, and they are responsible for the production of most elements via nucleosynthesis. This course covers the energy generation and transport in stars, stellar atmospheres and radiative transfer, stellar evolution, and asteroseismology. The Sun and its heliosphere are also studied as the closest and best-studied examples of a star and its circumstellar plasma. This course also provides a brief survey of planetary astrophysics, including the dominant processes acting in the interiors and atmospheres of planets in our own solar system and in others.
Note: This course offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 200 (may be taken concurrently).

Astronomy 201b. Interstellar Medium and Star Formation
Catalog Number: 4206
Karin Oberg
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 11
The interstellar medium (ISM) is the reservoir of gas and dust between stars. It is the nursery of new stars and planets, and the depository of energy and material from stellar winds and supernovae. This course will treat the often extreme physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium under its observed range of temperatures, densities, and radiation fields. It will cover the processes that govern the interactions between the ISM, stars and their host galaxies, including star and planet formation, and feedback from stellar deaths. The observational and laboratory methods and results that underpin the theories of interstellar environments will be highlighted.
Note: This course offered in alternate years.

[Astronomy 202a. Galaxies and Dynamics]
Catalog Number: 8237
Daniel James Eisenstein
Half course (fall term). M., W., 9:30–11.
An overview of extragalactic astronomy. Galaxy formation, evolution and properties, galactic dynamics, clustering, gas dynamics, star formation and other topics at the frontiers of extragalactic astronomy.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered in alternate years.

[Astronomy 202b. Cosmology]
Catalog Number: 2446
Daniel James Eisenstein and John M. Kovac
Half course (spring term). M., W., 10–11:30.
The cosmological principle: isotropy and homogeneity, cosmological world models, thermal history of the Big Bang, the microwave background, inflation, growth of density fluctuations, large scale structure and other topics at the frontiers of cosmology.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered in alternate years.

[Astronomy 215hf. Topics in Contemporary Astrophysics]
Catalog Number: 38496
Edo Berger
Half course (throughout the year). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
This full year half course will cover a broad range of contemporary topics in observational and theoretical astrophysics through a set of 10-12 two-week modules taught by members of the Astronomy Department faculty. The course will meet twice per week, and each module will be comprised of a stand-alone topic with a single homework assignment. Enrolled students will be required to sign up for the full year and attend half of the offered modules.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: This course is open to all astronomy graduate students.

[Astronomy 218. Radio Astronomy]
Catalog Number: 2883
James M. Moran
Half course (fall term). M., W., 2:30–4.
Historical development; diffraction theory of antennas and interferometers; signal detection and measurement techniques. Thermal, synchrotron and spectral-line emission in the context of radio observations of the sun, planets, pulsars, masers, hydrogen clouds, molecular clouds, ionized regions, active galaxies, quasars, and the cosmic background. Observational projects and laboratory exercises carried out with the Submillimeter Array, Haystack Observatory and the CMB Laboratory.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Astronomy 200 or Physics 153 recommended.

[Astronomy 219. High Energy Astrophysics]
Catalog Number: 1858
Jonathan E. Grindlay and Alexey A. Vikhlinin
Half course (spring term). M., W., 2–3:30.
Discussion of relativistic and high-energy astrophysical phenomena and observational techniques. Accretion onto compact stars (white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes); active galactic nuclei, galaxy clusters. Gamma-ray bursts and cosmic rays. X-ray and gamma-ray background.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered in alternate years.

Astronomy 231. Practical Optics for Astronomers
Catalog Number: 65534
Andrew Szentgyorgyi
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
he primary goal of this course is to familiarize consumers of astronomical data with the fundamental physical principles that underlie the instruments that they use to gather data, as well as provide insight into the engineering constraints that bound the capabilities of available instruments. Topics will include first order optical design principles, the design of telescopes, cameras and spectrographs, as well as basic optical engineering principles and computer aided design.
Note: This course offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: A solid grasp of 1st and 2nd year undergraduate physics and fluency in the application of differential and integral calculus to physical problems.

Astronomy 251. Quantum Mechanics for Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 5381
Lars Hernquist
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 5
Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic and molecular processes important in astronomical environments. Atomic and molecular structure; spectroscopy (selection rules, oscillator strengths, photoionization); scattering theory (elastic, inelastic, approximate methods); line broadening; collision processes (cross sections, rate coefficients) involving electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules.
Note: This course offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Physics 143a or the equivalent, or permission of instructor.

[Astronomy 253. Plasma Astrophysics]
Catalog Number: 64783
Steven Robert Cranmer and Nicholas Murphy
Half course (spring term). M., W., 3:30–5.
This course provides an introduction to plasma physics and plasma processes in an astrophysical context. Topics include charged particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, waves, instabilities, dynamos, shocks, particle acceleration, and magnetic reconnection. Specific applications may include solar and stellar coronae (including flares), interplanetary space plasmas, magnetized accretion disks, cosmic rays, galactic dynamos, and interstellar turbulence.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. This course offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of intermediate electromagnetism, partial differential equations, and fluid dynamics. Ay151 (Fluid Dynamics) is recommended but not required.

Cross-listed Courses

Applied Mathematics 205. Advanced Scientific Computing: Numerical Methods
[Earth and Planetary Sciences 238. Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer of Planetary Atmospheres]
Engineering Sciences 237. Planetary Radiation and Climate - (New Course)
Physics 210. General Theory of Relativity
Physics 251a. Advanced Quantum Mechanics I

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

Unless otherwise specified, these courses are given fall term, repeated spring term.

*Astronomy 300. Topics in Modern Astrophysics
Catalog Number: 7915
Charles Alcock 5194, Sean M. Andrews 6903, Edo Berger 6027, David Charbonneau 5225, Charles Conroy 7746, Steven Robert Cranmer 3185, Thomas M. Dame 2755, Rosanne Di Stefano 1508, Daniel James Eisenstein 6590, Martin S. Elvis 2530, Giovanni G. Fazio 1143, Douglas Finkbeiner 5556 (on leave 2014-15), Christine Jones Forman 5766, William R. Forman 6075, Alyssa Goodman 3348, Jonathan E. Grindlay 4593, Lars Hernquist 4250, Matthew Holman 1260, John Asher Johnson 7400, Justin C. Kasper 6261, Robert P. Kirshner 1071, John M. Kovac 6553, Charles J. Lada 7823, David W. Latham 3716, Abraham Loeb 3349, Jeffrey E. McClintock 2108, James M. Moran 4090 (on leave 2014-15), Ruth Ann Murray-Clay 6913, Ramesh Narayan 2871, Karin Oberg 7422, Philip M. Sadler 2231, Dimitar D. Sasselov 1020, Irwin I. Shapiro 7660, Howard A. Smith 6880, Alicia M. Soderberg 6570 (on leave fall term), Christopher Stubbs 4856 (on leave 2014-15), Alexey A. Vikhlinin 7268, and David J. Wilner 2855
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 2; Spring: 16
A seminar, reading, or research course may be arranged with any of the faculty listed. Students can also arrange to obtain Astronomy 300 credit for reading or research with scientific staff members of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; consult Astronomy Department office.

*Astronomy 301hf. Journal Club
Catalog Number: 5224
Edo Berger 6027 and Alicia M. Soderberg 6570 (on leave fall term) (spring term only)
Half course (throughout the year). Tu., at 4. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 6; Spring: 17
Each week two speakers (faculty, lecturers, and students) will report on current research in astronomy, providing students with an opportunity to practice the organization and presentation of technical material. A minimum of one presentation will be expected from each student each year focused on their own research or new results in the literature. Faculty will similarly discuss recent results from the literature, as well as their own research as a way to provide an overview of research activities at the Harvard Astronomy Department. The course is intended as an opportunity for substantive discussion, as an opportunity to find out about research activities, and to foster interaction between the students and faculty.
Note: This course is offered each semester and attendance is required for all registered graduate students in Astronomy.

*Astronomy 302. Scientists Teaching Science
Catalog Number: 9869
Philip M. Sadler 2231
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 6
Learn the secrets of lecturing well, leading discussions, connecting to real-world applications, and creating tests in any scientific discipline as we focus on relevant educational research and case studies, plus engage in practical classroom activities.
Note: Open to graduate students in all areas of science. Assignments help illustrate research findings from life, earth, and physical science education. Undergraduates with an interest in teaching at the pre-college level may be admitted with instructor permission. This course offered each year.
Prerequisite: Experience as a teaching fellow or tutor.

Cross-listed Courses

*Statistics 310hfr (formerly *Statistics 310hf). Topics in Astrostatistics