Follow us on Twitter Visit us on Tumblr Visit us on Facebook Visit us on YouTube

Biological Sciences in Public Health

Faculty of the Committee on Higher Degrees in Public Health Sciences

Michael Grusby, Professor of Molecular Immunology, and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (Public Health) (Chair)

Faculty of the Subcommittee on the Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences in Public Health

Brendan D. Manning, Professor of Genetics and Complex Diseases (Public Health) (Chair)
Michael Grusby, Professor of Molecular Immunology, and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (Public Health) (ex officio)
Daniel L. Hartl, Higgins Professor of Biology (FAS) and Professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases (Public Health)
Lester Kobzik, Professor in the Department of Environmental Health (Public Health), Professor of Pathology (Medical School)
Susan Mango, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Frank M. Sacks, Professor of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention (Public Health), Professor of Medicine (Medical School)
Marianne Wessling-Resnick, Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry (Public Health)
Dyann F. Wirth, Richard Pearson Strong Professor of Infectious Disease (Public Health)

Other Faculty Offering Instruction in Biological Sciences in Public Health

The FAS Standing Committee on Higher Degrees in Public Health Sciences has the general responsibility of overseeing the existing PhD degree programs in biological sciences and biostatistics and developing new PhD programs in other important domains of public health.

The committee is composed of representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the School of Public Health, and the Medical School. The committee membership is drawn from the biological and numeric sciences to reflect the current PhD programs. As new programs are created in the future, members representing other relevant disciplines will be added to the committee.

The committee works with the Subcommittee on the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences and the Subcommittee on the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biostatistics to make policy decisions and ensure the continuing strengths of those programs. The committee is also charged with initiating discussion of and planning for additional PhD programs.

The Subcommittee on the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences in Public Health (with membership from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Medical School, and the School of Public Health) and the Subcommittee on the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biostatistics (with membership from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the School of Public Health) hold responsibility for oversight of their respective programs, including monitoring requirements and standards for the degree and creating standards for admission.

For more courses of interest, see the School of Public Health catalog.

Primarily for Graduates

*BPH 201r. Laboratory Rotations
Catalog Number: 32079
Brendan D. Manning (Public Health)
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Members of the Division of Biological Sciences offer hands-on experimental methods of research in biological sciences. Students write a paper and give an oral presentation regarding their 10-week laboratory project.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as DBS 300.

BPH 206. Advanced Respiratory Physiology
Catalog Number: 1049
James Preston Butler (Medical School)
Half course (fall term). M., W., 9–10:20. EXAM GROUP: 10
Respiratory measurements are an integral part of public health research. We will critically discuss their scientific bases, noting practical considerations and pitfalls, and their interpretations and inferences about physiological status and disease.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as EH 223.
Prerequisite: EH 205 or equivalent, or signature of instructor indicating suitable background required. College-level physiology.

BPH 208. Human Physiology
Catalog Number: 3627
Stephanie A. Shore (Public Health)
Half course (fall term). M., W., 10:30–12:20. EXAM GROUP: 5
An introduction to the principles governing function in the human body designed to provide a framework in physiology for future public health researchers and professionals who have not taken college level physiology courses. Emphasis on the concept of homeostasis and on integrative aspects of physiology. Examples of pathophysiology and environmental physiology highlight these processes.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as EH 205. Required lab.
Prerequisite: College-level introductory biology or permission of the instructor.

BPH 210. Pathophysiology of Human Disease
Catalog Number: 3078
Lester Kobzik
Half course (spring term). M., F., 1:30–3:20. EXAM GROUP: 8
Surveys major human disease problems in the cardiovascular, respiratory, hematopoietic, reproductive, and gastrointestinal systems. Emphasis on understanding the pathophysiologic basis of common disease manifestations and the pathogenesis of the disease process.
Note: Offered jointly with the Medical School as BPH 729.0 and with the School of Public Health as EH 208.
Prerequisite: A college-level human physiology course.

BPH 215. Principles of Toxicology
Catalog Number: 5366
Vishal S. Vaidya (Medical School)
Half course (fall term). M., W., 10:30–12:20. EXAM GROUP: 5
Emphasizes mechanisms of injury and clinical consequences following exposures to environmental and occupational chemicals. Examines actions at the molecular, cellular, organ system, and organismal levels. Discusses methods for detecting, evaluating, analyzing, and combating toxic effects.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as EH 504.
Prerequisite: Organic chemistry and mammalian physiology or equivalent.

BPH 222. The Science of Human Nutrition
Catalog Number: 0216
Frank M. Sacks (Medical School, Public Health), Clifford Lo (Medical School, Public Health) and members of the Department
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1:30–3:20. EXAM GROUP: 1
A review of the biochemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals in the context of human disease. Contemporary topics are emphasized. Particular emphasis given to current knowledge of the mechanisms that may explain the role of diet in the causation and/or prevention of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and cancer. Recommended dietary intakes of selected nutrients are discussed in order to understand their limitations.
Note: Offered jointly with the Medical School as BPH 733.0 and with the School of Public Health as NUT 202.
Prerequisite: Introductory nutrition course. Prior familiarity with nutrition and the health sciences expected, as well as a basic knowledge of biochemistry and human physiology.

*BPH 225r. Advanced Topics in Biological Sciences in Public Health: Seminar
Catalog Number: 58162
Marianne Wessling-Resnick (Public Health)
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
A series of discussions and seminars each running for a half term (7-8 weeks).

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*BPH 301. Biological Sciences Seminars
Catalog Number: 1152
Marianne Wessling-Resnick (Public Health) 1315, Brendan Manning (Public Health) 5293
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 9–10:20. EXAM GROUP: 15
Faculty present seminars on their current research in the biological sciences and direct a student discussion of the logic and experimental design of this research. Topics include chemical and viral carcinogenesis, DNA damage and repair, immunology, molecular biology, metabolism, cardiovascular disease, parasitology, and how these areas apply to public health issues.
Note: Required for first-year students in the BPH program. Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as DBS 205.

*BPH 312. Regulation of the Cellular Uptake of Macromolecular Nutrients
Catalog Number: 2736
Marianne Wessling-Resnick (Public Health) 1315
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: 5

*BPH 315. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Gene Expression and Drug Resistance in Parasitic Protozoan, Including Leishmania and Malaria
Catalog Number: 2756
Dyann F. Wirth (Public Health) 2492
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 1; Spring: 8

*BPH 319. Signaling Mechanisms of Peptide Hormones, Genetic and Molecular Basis of Obesity and Diabetes
Catalog Number: 8425
Gokhan S. Hotamisligil (Public Health) 2725
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 18; Spring: 14

*BPH 322. Study of Epidemiologic and Biological Characteristics of HIV Viruses in Africa
Catalog Number: 4523
Phyllis J. Kanki (Public Health) 2270
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 323. Human Lipoprotein Metabolism: Biochemistry and Metabolic Modeling
Catalog Number: 5530
Frank M. Sacks 2276
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 11; Spring: 7

*BPH 325. Assessment of the Impact of Workplace Pollutants on Health
Catalog Number: 7448
David Christiani (Public Health, Medical School) 1514
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 1; Spring: 8

*BPH 334. Molecular Basis of Host Cell Invasion, Signaling, Differentiation by the Human Pathogen, T. Cruzi
Catalog Number: 2409
Barbara Burleigh (Public Health) 2763
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 8; Spring: 1

*BPH 336. Study of Human and Primate T-lymphotrophic Retroviruses Including Agents that Cause AIDS
Catalog Number: 3248
Myron Essex (Public Health) 2499
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 14; Spring: 11

*BPH 339. Mechanical Basis of Airway and Lung Parenchymal Function
Catalog Number: 6572
Jeffrey J. Fredberg (Public Health) 1303
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 345. Lung Macrophage Differentiation and Function
Catalog Number: 1495
Lester Kobzik (Medical School, Public Health) 1313
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 11; Spring: 7

*BPH 348. Human and Related Primate Retroviruses
Catalog Number: 3024
Tun-hou Lee (Public Health) 2769
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 1; Spring: 8

*BPH 357. Physiological and Pharmacological Aspects of Bronchoconstriction.
Catalog Number: 5047
Stephanie A. Shore (Public Health) 1304
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 17; Spring: 13

*BPH 358. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins and Vaccine Development
Catalog Number: 0241
Joseph G. Sodroski (Medical School, Public Health) 1712
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 365. Virulence Factors of Mycrobacteria
Catalog Number: 5044
Eric J. Rubin (Public Health) 4084
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 13; Spring: 9

*BPH 366. Approaches to Population Biology and the Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Catalog Number: 7822
Marc Lipsitch (Public Health) 4097
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 8; Spring: 1

*BPH 368. Host-pathogen Interactions of Shigella
Catalog Number: 6995
Marcia Goldberg (Medical School) 3783
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 14; Spring: 11

*BPH 372. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Pathogenesis of Human Malaria
Catalog Number: 2598
Manoj T. Duraisingh (Public Health) 5177
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 11; Spring: 7

*BPH 374. Nuclear Lipid Receptors as Therapeutic Targets of Metabolic Diseases
Catalog Number: 3153
Chih-Hao Lee (Public Health) 5294
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 1; Spring: 8

*BPH 375. Signaling Pathways Underlying Tumorigenesis and Metabolic Diseases
Catalog Number: 3159
Brendan D. Manning (Public Health) 5293
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 376. Secretion and pathogenesis in M. tuberculosis
Catalog Number: 7620
Sarah Merritt Fortune (Public Health) 5736
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 11; Spring: 7

*BPH 377. Host-Pathogen Interactions in Malaria Parasites
Catalog Number: 98913
Matthias Marti (Public Health) 6439
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 379. Transcriptional Mechanisms that Regulate Inflammatory Gene Expression
Catalog Number: 21747
Tiffany Horng (Public Health) 6612
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 6; Spring: 17

*BPH 380. Interplay Between the Innate Immune System/Intestinal Microbial Communities
Catalog Number: 73269
Wendy S. Garrett (Public Health) 6613
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 381. Receptor Signaling and Disease
Catalog Number: 41678
Quan Lu (Public Health) 6774
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: 15

*BPH 382. Aging, Stress Resistance and Dietary Restriction
Catalog Number: 48113
James Mitchell (Public Health) 6907
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 6; Spring: 17

*BPH 383. Gene regulation and environmental epigenetics
Catalog Number: 85351
Bernardo Lemos Silva (Public Health) 3606
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 7; Spring: 18

*BPH 384. Sex and reproduction Anopheles gambiae: targets for the control of malaria transmission
Catalog Number: 43307
Flaminia Catteruccia (Public Health) 3493
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 6; Spring: 17

*BPH 385. The Molecular Genetics of Aging
Catalog Number: 36534
William Mair (Public Health) 3550
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 17; Spring: 13

*BPH 386. Kidney Disease: From Translational Biomarkers to Molecular Mechanisms & Regenerative Medicine
Catalog Number: 19866
Vishal S. Vaidya (Medical School) 6964
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 9; Spring: 2

*BPH 387. The tumor suppressor p53-mediated stress response in human cancer
Catalog Number: 67403
Zhi-Min Yuan (Public Health) 9265
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: 12

*BPH 388. Functional analysis of microbial communities and the human microbiome
Catalog Number: 96614
Curtis Huttenhower (Public Health) 6551
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: 3

*BPH 389. Cell Metabolism: Biology and Disease - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 60418
Robert V. Farese, Jr. (Public Health) 7671
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 14; Spring: 11

*BPH 390. Cellular Mechanisms of Lipid Homeostasis - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 92382
Tobias Walther (Public Health) 7670
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). . EXAM GROUP: Fall: 16; Spring: 6

Quarter Courses for Graduate Students Only

*BPH 301qc. Molecular Basis for Nutritional & Metabolic Diseases
Catalog Number: 29149
Chih-Hao Lee (Public Health) 5294 and Gokhan S. Hotamisligil (Public Health) 2725
Quarter course (spring term). M., 12:30–1:20, W., 10:30–12:10. EXAM GROUP: 7
Students have an opportunity to review and analyze key papers that provide physiological and molecular evidence that bears on a topic of current interest in human nutrition and related disorders. Additionally, students learn skills necessary for critical thinking, and oral and written presentations.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as ID 512.

*BPH 302qc. Interdisciplinary Training in Pulmonary Sciences Part II
Catalog Number: 95778
Quan Lu (Public Health) 6774 and Lester Kobzik 1313
Quarter course (spring term). Tu., 9:30–11:30, F., 12:30–1:20. EXAM GROUP: 17
The intersection of environment and health is by necessity an interdisciplinary focus. The most promising advances in lung biology and respiratory disease are resulting from teams of scientists with diverse disciplinary training, including biology, medicine, engineering, and physics. In addition to a strong foundation in a specific discipline, the ability to recognize and act upon opportunities presented by outside disciplines is a crucial skill. This course is designed to train scientists to approach lung biology and respiratory diseases with an interdisciplinary perspective, in particular by bridging the gap between life sciences and physical/engineering sciences. With a focus on laboratory sciences and on mechanistic levels of understanding, course materials will cover 3 main problem areas: asthma, air pollution, and lung infection. The course consists of weekly course-meetings (lectures and case-studies) plus weekly research seminars from the physiology program. Students will gain skills in recognizing the relative strengths and weaknesses of different disciplinary approaches applied to pulmonary sciences, in designing interdisciplinary experiments effectively, and in interpreting interdisciplinary results critically.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as EH 513.

*BPH 303qc. Critical Reading in Pathophysiology of Human Diseases
Catalog Number: 44256
Lester Kobzik 1313
Quarter course (spring term). Tu., 3:30–5. EXAM GROUP: 13
The objectives of this course are to enhance and supplement knowledge of pathophysiology learned in the main course. This course will use critical reading to explore primary literature, and is especially intended for graduate students in the biological sciences. The course materials and discussions will provide a deeper understanding of the application and translation of basic pathophysiology, as found in current biomedical research.
Note: Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as EH 526.

*BPH 304qc. Ecological and Epidemiological Control of Parasitic Diseases
Catalog Number: 59363
Matthias Marti (Public Health) 6439 and Dyann F. Wirth (Public Health) 2492
Quarter course (fall term). M., W., F., 3:30–5:20. EXAM GROUP: 14
Provides an introduction to ecological and epidemiological concepts basic to the control of infectious agents. Considers important parasitic diseases of particular significance in the developing areas of the world. Epidemiological principles of vector-associated diseases are elucidated through study of entities such as malaria and schistosomiasis.
Note: Offered jointly with School of Public Health as IID 201.
Prerequisite: Background in biology required; knowledge of pathogenesis of infectious diseases desirable.

*BPH 305qc. Interdisciplinary Training in Pulmonary Sciences Part 1
Catalog Number: 22948
Quan Lu (Public Health) 6774 and Lester Kobzik 1313
Quarter course (fall term). Tu., 9:30–10:20, F., 12:30–1:20. EXAM GROUP: 2
The intersection of environment and health is by necessity an interdisciplinary focus. The most promising advances in lung biology and respiratory disease are resulting from teams of scientists with diverse disciplinary training, including biology, medicine, engineering, and physics. In addition to a strong foundation in a specific discipline, the ability to recognize and act upon opportunities presented by outside disciplines is a crucial skill. This course is designed to train scientists to approach lung biology and respiratory diseases with an interdisciplinary perspective, in particular by bridging the gap between life sciences and physical/engineering sciences. With a focus on laboratory sciences and on mechanistic levels of understanding, course materials will cover 3 main problem areas: asthma, air pollution, and lung infection. The course consists of weekly course-meetings (lectures and case-studies) plus weekly research seminars from the physiology program. Students will gain skills in recognizing the relative strengths and weaknesses of different disciplinary approaches applied to pulmonary sciences, in designing interdisciplinary experiments effectively, and in interpreting interdisciplinary results critically.
Note: Offered jointly with School of Public Health as EH 512.

*BPH 306qc. Tuberculosis
Catalog Number: 89577
Sarah Merritt Fortune (Public Health) 5736, Edward Anthony Nardell (Public Health) 6885, and Eric J. Rubin (Public Health) 4084
Quarter course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1:30–3:20. EXAM GROUP: 5
This is a comprehensive survey course on tuberculosis featuring lectures by some of the leading authorities in the field. The first half of the course focuses on population issues (TB epidemiology in the US and the world), transmission, modeling, and programmatic issues (the essentials of good TB control both here and in high burden countries). The second month deals more with the biomedical aspects of TB, immunology, genetics, diagnosis, decision analysis, and treatment, again, both here and abroad. There is a field trip to the Massachusetts State Laboratory. Because of involvement of several of the faculty, special attention is paid to the global problem of multidrug resistant TB, and the work of Partners in Health, an NGO associated with the medical school. During the second month, medical students join the SPH students for an elective course involving patient interviews at the state TB hospital. They present these cases and related topics in class during the second month. SPH students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and one or more presentations on relevant TB topics of interest. The course ends on or near World TB Day, with optional TB-related activities in the Boston area.
Note: Offered jointly with School of Public Health as IID 202.

*BPH 308qc. Molecular Signals to Understand Exposure Biology
Catalog Number: 25653
Vishal S. Vaidya (Medical School) 6964
Quarter course (spring term). Fall: Th., 10:30-12:20; Spring: Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 1
This course will offer students a deeper understanding of molecular signals often termed, as "Biomarkers" that serve as highly useful tools for understanding the biology of the disease as well as nature and extent of human exposure from environmental contaminants and drugs. The course is divided in 4 modules: 1) Biomarker discovery, 2) Organ/Disease specific biomarkers, 3) Multiscale technologies for biomarker quantitation, and 4) Clinical and statistical considerations in biomarker research.
Note: Offered jointly with School of Public Heath as EH 527.

*BPH 309qc. Tumor Cell Signaling and Metabolism
Catalog Number: 63523 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Brendan D. Manning (Public Health) 5293
Quarter course (fall term). M., F., 1:30–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 8
This course will focus on the metabolic reprogramming of cells as they undergo the transformation from normal to cancer cells. Emphasis will be placed on the unique nutrient and energy demands of growing tumors, the molecular mechanisms by which oncogenic signaling pathways alter cellular metabolism, and therapeutic opportunities arising from the profound differences in the metabolism of normal versus tumor cells. This course consists of one lecture and one session of critical reading of current primary literature related to the lecture each week.
Note: This course will be taught every other year (odd years). Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as GCD 213.
Prerequisite: Preference given to PhD students in HILS-affiliated programs (e.g., BPH, BBS, etc.)

*BPH 310qc. Molecular Mechanisms of Aging
Catalog Number: 61482
James Mitchell (Public Health) 6907
Quarter course (fall term). M., F., 1:30–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 5
We will explore molecular mechanisms underlying aging and aging-related disease. Topics will include nutrient signaling and energy metabolism, genome stability and proteostasis, interventional approaches to extended longevity, and theories of aging including the free radical theory. Recent and classic literature will be critically discussed.
Note: This course will be taught every other year (odd years). Offered jointly with the School of Public Health as GCD 212.
Prerequisite: Preference given to PhD students in HILS-affiliated programs (e.g., BPH, BBS, etc.)

*BPH 316qc. Molecular and Cell Biology of Infectious Diseases
Catalog Number: 36484 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Barbara Burleigh (Public Health) 2763 and Matthias Marti (Public Health) 6439
Quarter course (spring term). Tu., Th., 3:30–5:20. EXAM GROUP: 12
This course will focus on medically important eukaryotic parasites (including malaria, toxoplasma, leishmania, trypanosomes, amoebae, and giardia). We will examine central themes in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Critical readings and discussions will emphasize biochemistry, cell and molecular biology of host-pathogen interactions during the establishment and maintenance of infection in hosts and host cells. To the extent to which it is possible, infection strategies of protozoan parasites will be compared and contrasted to those of bacterial and viral pathogens in hosts and host cells.
Note: Offered jointly with School of Public Health as IID216. Meeting Dates: January 28 - March 13. Offered with BPH 317qc.

*BPH 317qc. Immunology of Infectious Diseases
Catalog Number: 6938 Enrollment: Limited to 35.
Barbara Burleigh (Public Health) 2763
Quarter course (spring term). Tu., Th., 3:30–5:20. EXAM GROUP: 15
The available information on molecular and cellular basis of innate immune responses has exploded in the last decade. In particular de role of Toll-Like receptors, inflammasomes and nucleic acid-sensing cytoplasmatic receptors on resistance to and pathogenesis of infectious diseases have been scrutinized. The main focus of the course will be on the interface of the innate and acquired immune system with microbial pathogens, discussing the role that these interactions play in protective versus deleterious immune responses, and thereby, on disease outcome. The program will promote discussions on fundamental concepts as well as new advances in the role of innate immunity in host resistance and pathogenesis of infectious diseases, with special emphasis on infections of the tropics. Each lecture requires reading several relevant papers and completion of a problem set. A final paper, in the format of a research proposal, is required.
Note: Offered jointly with the Medical School as BPH 724.0 and with the School of Public Health as IID 208. Each lecture requires reading several relevant papers and completion of a problem set. Meeting Dates: March 25 - May 15. Offered with BPH 316qc.
Prerequisite: An immunology course.

*BPH 319qc. Biology and Control of Insect Vectors in Human Health - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 15743
Flaminia Catteruccia (Public Health)
Half course (spring term). W., 3:30–6:20. EXAM GROUP: 3
The course will provide an introduction to the biology, genetics and control of insect vectors of infectious diseases that are relevant for Public Health. The focus will be on the mosquito vectors of human malaria, however students will study other vector-borne diseases including African Trypanosomiasis, Dengue and Yellow Fever. The course will address the major biological components shaping vectorial capacity: vector/parasite interactions; immunity; host seeking behavior, reproduction; chemoreception. The role of symbionts and microbiota in insect physiology and disease transmission will also be discussed. Strengths and limitations of current control strategies based on the use of insecticides (bednets and sprays), traps, larvicidal compounds, biological agents and environmental strategies will be discussed, as well as novel strategies based on genetically modified organisms and paratransgenic control (bacteria/fungi). Students will also learn current methods for functional and comparative genomics of principal disease vectors.
Note: The course runs from May 23, 2015 - May 15, 2015.