Follow us on Twitter Visit us on Tumblr Visit us on Facebook Visit us on YouTube

East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Faculty of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Shigehisa Kuriyama, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History (Chair)
Ryuichi Abe, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions
Peter K. Bol, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (on leave spring term)
Ryan Marshall Cook, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Edwin A. Cranston, Professor of Japanese Literature (on leave spring term)
Lianbin Dai, College Fellow in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Mark P. Dallas, Visiting Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Xiaonan Deng, Visiting Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Nara Dillon, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Carter J. Eckert, Yoon Se Young Professor of Korean History
Mark C. Elliott, Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History
Matthew Fraleigh, Visiting Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Binnan Gao, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Andrew Gordon, Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History
Helen Hardacre, Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions and Society
David Howell, Professor of Japanese History
Haibo Hu, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Hui-Yen Huang, Senior Preceptor in Chinese
Wesley M. Jacobsen, Professor of the Practice of the Japanese Language and Director of the Japanese Language Program
Hee-Jeong Jeong, Preceptor in Korean
Heeyeong Jung, Preceptor in Korean
Yuko Kageyama-Hunt, Senior Preceptor in Japanese
Miki Kaneda, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Sun Joo Kim, Harvard-Yenching Professor of Korean History
Jie Li, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Wai-yee Li, Professor of Chinese Literature (Director of Graduate Studies)
Jennifer Li-Chia Liu, Senior Lecturer on Chinese Language and Director of the Chinese Language Program (on leave fall term)
Wei Liu, Preceptor in Chinese
Yasuko Matsumoto, Preceptor in Japanese
Satomi Matsumura, Senior Preceptor in Japanese (on leave fall term)
David McCann, Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Literature (on leave spring term)
Melissa M. McCormick, Professor of Japanese Art and Culture
Binh Ngo, Senior Preceptor in Vietnamese and Director of the Vietnamese Language Program
Sang-suk Oh, Senior Preceptor in Korean and Director of the Korean Language Program
Mareike Ohlberg, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Stephen Owen, James Bryant Conant University Professor
Michael J. Puett, Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History
James Robson, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (Director of Undergraduate Studies)
Kevin C. Schoenberger, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Mi-Ryong Shim, Lecturer on East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Ikue Shingu, Preceptor in Japanese
Hongyun Sun, Preceptor in Chinese (on leave spring term)
Michael A. Szonyi, Professor of Chinese History (on leave 2013-14)
Xiaofei Tian, Professor of Chinese Literature
Leonard W. J. van der Kuijp, Professor of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies
David Der-Wei Wang, Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature
Xuedong Wang, Preceptor in Chinese
Miki Yagi, Preceptor in Japanese
Lei Yan, Preceptor in Chinese
Tomiko Yoda, Takashima Professor of Japanese Humanities (on leave 2013-14)
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Chen Zhang, Preceptor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Xin-Yi Zhang, Preceptor in Chinese

Other Faculty Offering Instruction in East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Janet Gyatso, Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies (Divinity School)
Wilt L. Idema, Professor of Chinese Literature, Emeritus
Yukio Lippit, Professor of History of Art and Architecture
Susan J. Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics

Affiliates of the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures

Karen Thornber, Professor of Comparative Literature

Committee for the Social Science Program in East Asian Studies of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Courses listed under the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations begin with department tutorials and then are grouped by area: China, Japan, Korea, Manchu, Mongolia, Tibet, and Vietnam. Each area is divided into language, history, and literature courses, then “Graduate Courses of Reading and Research,” and concludes with cross-listings from other departments. Please note that courses under each heading are categorized as either “For Undergraduates and Graduates” or “Primarily for Graduates.”

The concentration draws upon faculty working on East Asian topics from the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and from other departments. It offers both a humanities track, in which the history, literature, philosophy, and religion of premodern and modern times are studied, and a social science track, stressing approaches to modern East Asia drawn from the social science disciplines.

Courses in the Language Programs are designed to be taken in sequence and cannot be taken out of order. There are no auditors permitted in the Language Programs and language courses must be taken for a grade. Independent study in languages will only be offered after completion of all courses in the sequence, and with permission of the Director of that language. Placement and admission to a course is at the discretion of the Director of the Program.

East Asian Studies

Primarily for Undergraduates

East Asian Studies 90r. East Asian Language Tutorials
Catalog Number: 74997
James Robson and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Independent reading and research in an East Asian language.

*East Asian Studies 91r. Supervised Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 0961
James Robson and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Independent reading and research in East Asian Studies.
Note: Open to students who have given evidence of ability to do independent reading and research. May be taken on an individual basis or by small groups of students interested in working on the same topic. Permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies required.

East Asian Studies 97ab. Introduction to the Study of East Asia: Issues and Methods
Catalog Number: 2337
James Robson and members of the Department
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
This interdisciplinary and team-taught course provides an introduction to several of the approaches and methods through which the societies and cultures of East Asia can be studied at Harvard, including history, philosophy, literary studies, political science, film studies, anthropology and gender studies. We consider both commonalities and differences across the region, and explore how larger processes of imperialism, modernization, and globalization have shaped contemporary East Asian societies and their future trajectories.
Note: Required of sophomore concentrators and secondary field candidates. Open to freshmen. EAS 97ab may not be taken Pass/Fail.

[East Asian Studies 98a. Tutorial--Junior Year: State-Society Relations in Modern China]
Catalog Number: 0964
Elizabeth J. Perry
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Junior Tutorial for students in the China Social Science track.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. EAS 98a, 98b, 98d, 98g or a substitution approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required for all EAS concentrators. Preference to EAS concentrators but open to Government concentrators.

East Asian Studies 98b. Junior Tutorial--Japan and the World
Catalog Number: 8288
Susan J. Pharr
Half course (fall term). Tu., 3-5 with an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 17, 18
Junior Tutorial option for EAS. Open to Government and other concentrators. For students with an interest in the society, economy, politics, and popular culture of contemporary Japan and its place in the world.
Note: EAS 98a, 98b, 98d, 98g or a substitution approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required for all EAS concentrators.

East Asian Studies 98d. Junior Tutorial--The Political Economy of Modern China
Catalog Number: 4800
Nara Dillon
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3.
Junior Tutorial for students with an interest in China Social Sciences. After an introduction to the historical context of China’s development, this course will focus on the political economy of reform in the post-Mao period. Some of the topics covered include democracy, the 1989 Tiananmen protests, the rise of entrepreneurs, the role of labor, rural-urban migration, and the Internet.
Note: EAS 98a, 98b, 98d, 98g or a substitution approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required for all EAS concentrators. Preference to EAS students but open to Government concentrators.

[East Asian Studies 98f. Junior Tutorial —The Study of East Asian Religions]
Catalog Number: 94577
James Robson
Half course (fall term). Tu., at 2.
This tutorial is designed to deepen and extend the student’s knowledge of the study of East Asian religions. It will build on the student’s foundational understanding of the development and history of Buddhism, Daosim, Confucianism, Shinto, and various forms of popular religion, by situating that material in the context of larger issues in the study of East Asian religions. The overarching concern within this tutorial will be on reading and discussing methodologically oriented scholarship that will introduce the student to new and intellectually engaging approaches to the various traditions covered.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. EAS 98a, 98b, 98d, 98g or a substitution approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required for all EAS concentrators
Prerequisite: Culture and Belief 33: Introduction to the Study of East Asian Religions. If students have not previously taken this course, they are required to attend those lectures concurrently with this tutorial.

[East Asian Studies 98h. Junior Tutorial--Modern Korea History Reading and Research]
Catalog Number: 29637
Carter J. Eckert
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4.
Readings of various materials related to the history of modern Korea, in conjunction with the research and writing of a term paper using primary and secondary sources. Readings for fall 2012 will center on contemporary history after 1945.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Note: EAS 98a, 98b, 98d, 98g, 98h or a substitution approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies is required for all EAS concentrators.
Prerequisite: Societies of the World 27: The Two Koreas, or equivalent.

*East Asian Studies 99. Tutorial — Senior Year
Catalog Number: 0384
James Robson and members of the Department
Full course. Hours to be arranged.
Thesis guidance under faculty direction.
Note: All students writing an EAS or joint EAS thesis will attend a research and writing workshop that meets twice each term.

Cross-listed Courses

[Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 44. Arts of Asia]
[Culture and Belief 11. Medicine and the Body in East Asia and in Europe]
Culture and Belief 25. Studying Buddhism, Across Place and Time
Culture and Belief 33. Introduction to the Study of East Asian Religions
[Ethical Reasoning 29. Social Theory, the Humanities, and Philosophy Now]
Societies of the World 22. Asia in the Making of the Modern World

For Undergraduates and Graduates

East Asian Studies 107. Integrating China: Regions, Industries and Internationalization - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 84284 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Mark P. Dallas
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
The course concerns the political economy of China, in particular the political and social transformations of industrialization and international integration in the late 20th century. While the primary focus is China, the course also examines China within the broader East Asian region and incorporates contemporary history, political economy, and geography as interpretative lens.

[East Asian Studies 121. Global Cities in East Asia]
Catalog Number: 43797
Nara Dillon
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–4.
This course examines urbanization and globalization in East Asia, focusing first on the development of Tokyo as a global city, then turning to the socialist cities of contemporary China, before concluding with an examination of uneven development in Southeast Asian cities. In each section of the course, we will examine how urbanization and globalization affect major social groups (in particular, entrepreneurs and women) who have both propelled and been marginalized by these processes.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

East Asian Studies 128. Ideology in Contemporary Chinese Politics - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 88064
Mareike Ohlberg
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30–1. EXAM GROUP: 13, 14
The primary focus of this course is on understanding the complex and extremely flexible ideological system in contemporary China that is primarily constituted of Marxist dogmas but has integrated and continues to integrate Neo-liberal, Neo-authoritarian, Confucian, nationalist and various other elements from different schools of thought.

[East Asian Studies 129. The World of the Three Kingdoms: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 20018
Xiaofei Tian
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
This course explores the appeal of the “Three Kingdoms,” a dangerous and violent time, and examines the nostalgic construction of the world of the Three Kingdoms from medieval times through contemporary period, in the forms of fiction, poetry, plays, movies, TV series, video games, MVs and fan fiction. Using the concept of “nostalgia” as a point of entry, this class offers an account of the nuances in the phenomenon and sentiments of nostalgia about the Three Kingdoms in different periods throughout Chinese history, with emphasis on nostalgia as a historical emotion and a modern global condition.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students. All readings in English (students may opt to read in Chinese). No specific background in Chinese or East Asian Studies required.

East Asian Studies 130. The Tang - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 88747
Stephen Owen
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
The Tang was not only one of the largest and culturally cosmopolitan periods in Chinese history, it played a pivotal role in the formation of a shared "East Asian" culture. By looking at the history, literature, social and religious thought, and visual culture of the Tang, we will address a series of questions about historical culture: what are the presumptions and strengths of different disciplines and is it possible to cross them to some unified understanding? To what degree is our knowledge shaped by what gets recorded and what materially survives? How much of our understanding of a period is shaped by subsequent ages?
Note: Discussions and readings in English
Prerequisite: All readings in English; no knowledge of Literary or Modern Chinese required.

East Asian Studies 140. Major Religious Texts of East Asia
Catalog Number: 0856
Ryuichi Abe
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4:30. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
This course aims at enabling students to read and analyze in depth major religious texts of East Asia, representing diverse traditions and genres. The course encourages students to take up their reading of texts not only as ways to acquire knowledge on Asian religious traditions, but as practice, labor, and play in which their ordinary way of understanding/experiencing the world and themselves will be challenged, reaffirmed, and renewed.

[*East Asian Studies 160. Writing Asian Poetry]
Catalog Number: 0327 Enrollment: Limited to 16.
David McCann
Half course (spring term). M., 1–3.
The Japanese haiku is well known, widely published, written about, a part of most school curricula in the United States. The Korean sijo is less known, but stands as a compelling contrast on its own terms and as a verse form in English. The workshop will be reading examples of haiku and sijo, translations as well as poems written and published in English, then writing and comparing the forms. Participants will assemble portfolios of their own original work, with commentary and notes. We will also identify potential magazine, online or other literary journals, prepare and submit selections.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. No Asian language knowledge is required; all writing will be in English.

[East Asian Studies 191. Zen: History, Culture, and Critique]
Catalog Number: 39452
James Robson
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
This course is an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is the backbone of the Zen tradition, we will see that Zen has a number of different faces and will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3012.

*East Asian Studies 195. Fighting Poverty in China: Welfare and Disaster Relief in Comparative Perspective
Catalog Number: 78777 Enrollment: Limited to 15. Instructor’s signature on study card required.
Nara Dillon
Half course (spring term). M., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
This course is a research seminar on the political economy of poverty and inequality in China. Because China has tried such a wide variety of methods to combat poverty, it provides a useful "laboratory" for analyzing different anti-poverty policies. After an introduction to theories of the welfare state and international humanitarian relief, students will examine disaster relief and the welfare state in China, with comparisons to Europe, North America, and other developing countries.

Cross-listed Courses

History of Science 180. Science, Technology, and Society in Modern East Asia

Primarily for Graduates

[East Asian Studies 220r. Medieval Japanese Picture Scrolls]
Catalog Number: 1685
Melissa M. McCormick
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3.
Examines the rich tradition of medieval Japanese picture scrolls (emaki). Provides training in the reading of scroll texts (kotobagaki), the analysis of paintings, and the examination of the production contexts of important scrolls from the 12th to the 16th century. Aims to make picture scrolls available as a primary source for graduate research in many different disciplines within Japanese studies.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

East Asian Buddhist Studies

Primarily for Graduates

[East Asian Buddhist Studies 240r. Japanese Buddhist Doctrine and Monastic Culture: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 3768
Ryuichi Abe
Half course (fall term). F., 10–12.
A graduate seminar aimed at improving students’ ability to read and analyze scriptural sources in the context of textual, artistic, and other cultural productions centered around large monasteries in premodern Japan. Major theme for this semester: Buddhist cultural exchange between medieval Japan and China.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Classical Japanese and Kambun are required.

East Asian Buddhist Studies 241. Major Issues in the Study of East Asian Buddhism
Catalog Number: 57596
Ryuichi Abe and James Robson
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
A graduate seminar that critically examines major academic works in English on East Asian Buddhism. It is aimed at preparing EALC graduate students for their general examinations in the fields relevant to Buddhism.

[East Asian Buddhist Studies 245r. Ritual and Text in Japanese Buddhist Literature]
Catalog Number: 7113
Ryuichi Abe
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Examines the way in which rituals are approached, described, and interpreted in primary Japanese Buddhist texts. Students will acquire skills allowing them to move freely in their reading of texts from diverse literary genres.
Note: Expected to be given in 2016–17.
Prerequisite: Classical Japanese and Kambun.

[East Asian Buddhist Studies 255. Readings on Chinese Religions: Recent Scholarship on Chinese Buddhism: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 24345
James Robson
Half course (fall term). W., 1–4.
This seminar aims to discuss significant new works in the field of Chinese Religions by focusing on the historical, doctrinal, and philosophical development of the Buddhist tradition in China.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3232.

[East Asian Buddhist Studies 256r (formerly East Asian Buddhist Studies 256). Chinese Buddhist Texts--Readings in Medieval Buddho-Daoist Documents: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 69666
Ryuichi Abe and James Robson
Half course (spring term). W., 1–4.
This seminar focuses on the careful textual study and translation of a variety of Chinese Buddho-Daoist texts through the medieval period.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3233.
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of classical Chinese required.

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*East Asian Buddhist Studies 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 9811
Ryuichi Abe 4974, Janet Gyatso (Divinity School) 4243, and James Robson 6695

Cross-listed courses

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 36. Buddhism and Japanese Culture

East Asian Film and Media Studies

For Undergraduates and Graduates

East Asian Film and Media Studies 110. Film and Popular Culture Flows Across East Asia
Catalog Number: 64089
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
How does popular culture flow across East Asia? What are the consequences of this intense form of exchange in terms of politics, nation, and global media culture? This course maps the interaction of film, moving images and other forms of popular culture between Japan, Hong Kong and Korea. Topics include colonialism and its after effects, co-productions, fan cultures, recent attempts at national branding and the increasing significance of visual media such as animation, comic books, and video games.
Note: Students who have taken Freshman Seminar 34w are excluded from taking this course for credit.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 115. Sound and Image: The Politics and Practices of Experimental Arts in Japan after 1945 - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 87883
Miki Kaneda and Ryan Marshall Cook
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
In this course, we will investigate the activities of filmmakers, musicians, and artists through case studies that highlight the interplay of sound and image in experimental practices with a particular focus on music and film in the 1960s and 70s. We will also examine theories and methodologies of audio/visual performance and practice in the context of the changing postwar media environment. There will be a one-day field trip to The Museum of Modern Art in New York for this class. Participation in this field trip is highly recommended for course participants, but not a requirement. The exact date will be announced in early September.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 130. In Her Shadow: "Woman" in Modern Korean History, Literature, and Film - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 46306 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Mi-Ryong Shim
Half course (spring term). M., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
This inter-disciplinary course explores major issues in modern Korean history through the reoccurring and shifting trope of "woman". We will consider some of the social, cultural, and historical phenomena of 20th and 21st century Korea where primary actors have been women. In addition, we will examine how figures of women have been deployed in literary works and films to narrate diverse issues, such as possibilities of mass politics, colonial and national identities, and social anxieties over industrialization.
Note: All films and literature are subtitled or translated in English.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 150. Chinese Cinema - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 14983
Jie Li
Half course (spring term). M., 1–2:30, and an additional section to be arranged. Film screenings Wednesday, 7-9 pm. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
Introduction to major works, genres, and waves of Chinese cinema from the silent era to the present, including films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora. We will discuss formal aesthetics, historical representation, and audience reception. Students are encouraged to collaborate on their own short films in response to works we watch in class.

Cross-listed Courses

Primarily for Graduates

[East Asian Film and Media Studies 200 (formerly East Asian Studies 200). The Uses and Meaning of the New Arts of Presentation]
Catalog Number: 6509 Enrollment: Limited to 16.
Shigehisa Kuriyama
Half course (fall term). M., 4–6.
Exploration of the new horizons of communication created by current media technology and their implications for the future of teaching and scholarship. The seminar will combine theoretical readings and reflection with practical, hands-on experiments using podcasts, media-intensive lectures, and iMovies for conveying academic research.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[East Asian Film and Media Studies 201 (formerly East Asian Studies 215). Media Mix. Representations and Meaning Between Media in Japan: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 91266
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–5 with film screenings on Monday evenings.
This course will explore different histories of the interconnection of media in Japan, from the early ties between theater, literature and cinema to the popularization of the media mix by the company Kadokawa and the current routes between manga, anime, light novels, films and games.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[East Asian Film and Media Studies 202 (formerly East Asian Studies 216). Rip and Tear--The Body as Moving and Moved Image in Japanese Film: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 39744
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten
Half course (spring term). M., 2–5; and a weekly film screening W., 7–9. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
This course traces the role of the body as a discursive anchor in moving image culture in Japan. The focus will lie on the period after WW II, although the mapping of historical contexts will entail investigations into earlier histories as well.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 204. Three Times + 1. Transitional Moments in Film and Media Culture in Japan: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 80341
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
This seminar will focus on transitional moments in the history of film and media culture in Japan, all of them embedded in decisive socio-political shifts. It will explore the deep transformations manifesting around the years 1927, 1963, and 1995, with an additional focus on 1973.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 205. Sexuality, Gender, and Media Culture in Japan - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 85185
Alexander Nikolas Zahlten
Half course (spring term). Th., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
The seminar will explore aspects of the history of sexuality and gender in media culture in Japan. With a non-exclusive focus on moving image media It will identify different modes of dealing with sexuality and gender rather than simply readings of their expression. Spanning a time frame from the 1920s to the 2000s, this will entail the interplay of different media platforms with sexuality and gender, ranging from film to TV, video, and video games.

East Asian Film and Media Studies 220. Topics in Chinese Film and Media Studies: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 93879
Jie Li
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
This course addresses the question "What was/is cinema in China?" from shadow puppets to DV documentaries. Topics include cinema’s arrival in China, silent film stars, sound film sing-alongs, wartime collaborations, mobile projection teams, revolutionary model operas, and Chinese cinema’s transnational connections.

China: Language Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Chinese Ba. Elementary Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 4375
Hongyun Sun
Half course (fall term). Sections Tu., Th., 10, 11, 1, or 2, and three additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Non-intensive introduction to modern Chinese pronunciation, grammar, conversation, reading, and writing.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.

Chinese Bb. Elementary Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 8714
Hongyun Sun
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Continuation of Chinese Ba.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese Ba or equivalent.

*Chinese Bx. Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners
Catalog Number: 7066
Hui-Yen Huang
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10 or 12; and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
For students with significant listening and speaking background. Introductory Modern Chinese language course, with emphasis on reading and writing. Covers in one term the equivalent of Chinese Ba and Bb.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail. Students must pass a test in listening and speaking to take the course.

Chinese 120a. Intermediate Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 4283
Xuedong Wang
Half course (fall term). Sections Tu., Th., at 10, 12 or 2, and Drill M., W., F., at 10, 11, 12, or 2. EXAM GROUP: 12
Modern texts, conversation, reading, and composition.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese Bb or equivalent.

Chinese 120b. Intermediate Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 1702
Xuedong Wang
Half course (spring term). Sections Tu., Th., at 10, 12, or 2, and three additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Continuation of Chinese 120a.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 120a, or equivalent.

Chinese 123xb. Intermediate Modern Chinese for Advanced Beginners
Catalog Number: 7034
Hui-Yen Huang
Half course (spring term). Sections M., W., F. at 10 or 12, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Continuation of Chinese Bx. Covers in one term the equivalent of Chinese 120a and 120b.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese Bx, or instructor’s permission.

Chinese 130a. Advanced Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 6724
Haibo Hu
Half course (fall term). Sections Tu., Th., at 10, 11, or 1, and three additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
A study of writings selected from modern Chinese literature, academic works and newspaper articles, aimed at enhancing and further developing the student’s proficiency in modern Chinese language.
Note: Conducted in Chinese. No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Two years of modern Chinese.

Chinese 130b. Advanced Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 2917
Haibo Hu
Half course (spring term). Sections T., Th., at 10, 11, or 1, and three additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Continuation of Chinese 130a.
Note: Conducted in Chinese. No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 130a.

Chinese 130xa. Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Students
Catalog Number: 9097
Binnan Gao
Half course (fall term). Section I: M., W., F., at 10; Section II: M., W., F., at 12 and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Designed for heritage learners and covers the equivalent of Chinese 130a and other materials for reading and writing.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 120b, Chinese 123xb, Chinese 125ab, or with permission of instructor.

Chinese 130xb. Advanced Modern Chinese for Heritage Students
Catalog Number: 2437
Binnan Gao
Half course (spring term). Section I: M., W., F., at 10; Section II: M., W., F., at 12 and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Designed for heritage learners and covers the equivalent of Chinese 130b and other materials for reading and writing.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 130xa.

Chinese 140a. Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 1945
Lei Yan
Half course (fall term). Sections M., W., F., at 10, or 2, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Rapid reading of selections from books and articles.
Note: Conducted in Chinese. No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 130b, Chinese 130xb

Chinese 140b. Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese
Catalog Number: 6844
Lei Yan
Half course (spring term). Sections: M., W., F., at 10, or 2, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Continuation of Chinese 140a.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 140a.

*Chinese 142a. Advanced Conversational Chinese
Catalog Number: 3900 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Wei Liu
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30; Th., at 2, Tu., 2–4.
Spoken Chinese for advanced students.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail. No native speakers allowed. May not be used for citation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 130b, Chinese 130xb, or equivalent.

*Chinese 142b. Advanced Conversational Chinese
Catalog Number: 1418 Enrollment: Limited to 12. per lecture section.
Xin-Yi Zhang
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
Spoken Chinese for advanced students.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail. No native speakers allowed. May not be used for citation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 140a, Chinese 142a, or equivalent.

*Chinese 150a. Formal Chinese Writing and Speaking
Catalog Number: 5621 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Xin-Yi Zhang
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 9, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 2
The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire a comprehensive written grammar with sufficient formal vocabulary in modern Chinese. Formal patterns generated by combining single characters are used for the foundation of written grammar. This course also offers students authentic academic readings in order to improve their abilities in academic writing and formal speech. Students are required to write and present their essays in formal Chinese.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 140b or equivalent.

*Chinese 150b. Formal Chinese Writing and Speaking
Catalog Number: 8111 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Xin-Yi Zhang
Half course (spring term). M.,W.,F., at 9 and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 2
Continuation of Chinese 150a.
Note: No auditors. May not be taken Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite: Chinese 150a.

*Chinese 163. Business Chinese
Catalog Number: 6558 Enrollment: Limited to 25.
Wei Liu
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Fall: M., W., F., at 10 or 12 and two additional hours to be arranged; Spring: M., W., F., at 9 or 12 and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 3; Spring: 2
Designed for students interested in international business or for students who intend to work or travel for business in Chinese-speaking communities (including China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore), or for students who desire to improve their Chinese language proficiency. An introduction to business and economic climates, practices and customs of these communities. Students learn specialized business and economic vocabulary and the principles of business correspondence.
Note: Conducted in Chinese. May not be taken Pass/Fail, but may be taken Sat/Unsat by GSAS students.
Prerequisite: At least three years of modern Chinese or equivalent (with permission of instructor).

[Chinese 166r. Chinese in Humanities]
Catalog Number: 16522
Jennifer Li-Chia Liu and David Der-Wei Wang
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1; Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 6
Advanced language practice associated with authentic academic texts in humanities disciplines (e.g., art, literature, religious studies). May be offered independently in Chinese, or linked with an English-language content course. In spring 2013, the topic of this course is "Masterpieces of Modern Chinese Literature."
Note: Expected to be given in 2013–14. All readings and discussions in Chinese. Counts toward Language Citation in Modern Chinese.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Chinese 140b or equivalent proficiency.

[Chinese 168r. Chinese in Social Sciences]
Catalog Number: 59138
Jennifer Li-Chia Liu
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3
Advanced language practice associated with authentic academic texts in social science disciplines (e.g., history, politics, sociology, economics). In Fall 2012 the topic of the course is "Society and Culture of Late Imperial China" and it mirrors the issues covered in Chinese History 113.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Students are required to attend the lectures of Chinese History 113. Most readings in Chinese. Discussions in Chinese. Counts toward Language Citation in Modern Chinese.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Chinese 140b or equivalent proficiency.

[Chinese 187. Art and Violence in the Cultural Revolution]
Catalog Number: 1253
Xiaofei Tian
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–3.
Examines the cultural implications of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). We will examine how art was violent towards people and how violence was turned into an art. We will also consider the link between violence, trauma, memory and writing. Materials include memoir, fiction, essay, "revolutionary Peking Opera," and film.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Lectures and most readings in Chinese. Discussions in Chinese. Count toward Language Citation in Modern Chinese. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts C or Foreign Cultures, but not both.
Prerequisite: Four years of Mandarin or equivalent (with permission of instructor).

Literary Chinese Courses

Chinese 106a. Introduction to Literary Chinese
Catalog Number: 1185
Chen Zhang
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 11:30-1. EXAM GROUP: 5, 13, 14
Basic grammar and the reading of simple historical narrative.
Note: An additional lecture slot may be added if enough students enroll, with times to be arranged.
Prerequisite: At least one year of modern Chinese, or familiarity with Chinese characters through knowledge of Japanese or Korean.

Chinese 106b. Introduction to Literary Chinese
Catalog Number: 3600
Chen Zhang
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30–1. EXAM GROUP: 13, 14
Introduction to pre-Qin philosophical texts.
Note: An additional lecture slot may be added if enough students enroll, with times to be arranged.
Prerequisite: Chinese 106a or permission of instructor.

Chinese 107a. Intermediate Literary Chinese
Catalog Number: 3343
Chen Zhang
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
A second-year course designed to prepare students for reading and research using materials written in Literary Chinese. The focus in the fall semester will be prose from the Tang and Song dynasties.
Prerequisite: One year of literary Chinese (Chinese 106 or equivalent).

Chinese 107b. Intermediate Literary Chinese
Catalog Number: 6931
Chen Zhang
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
A continuation of Chinese 107a, introducing more prose styles as well as poetry and lyric.
Prerequisite: Chinese 107a or equivalent.

Primarily for Graduates

Chinese Pedagogy

Chinese 280. Teaching Chinese as a Foreign/Second Languages - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 42612
Jennifer Li-Chia Liu
Half course (spring term). F., 10–12.
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of teaching Chinese as a foreign/second language. It seeks to help students gain an understanding of the current issues and research about Chinese language instruction in the US.

China: History Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Chinese History 113. Society and Culture of Late Imperial China]
Catalog Number: 8264
Michael A. Szonyi
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
This course is a survey of the social and cultural history of China from the Song to the mid-Qing (roughly from 1000 to 1800). The main topics discussed include urbanization and commerce; gender; family and kinship; education and the examination system, and religion and ritual. The main goal of the course will be to explore the relationship between social and cultural changes and political and intellectual developments.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

Chinese History 115. Topics in Book History of Late Imperial China - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 37487
Lianbin Dai
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
The central question examined in this course is how to establish book history of late imperial China as a modern discipline before integrating or globalizing it into a framework of book history of the world. Topics include: book history as an interdisciplinary field, theories on book history, China’s tradition of book studies, China’s bibliographic tradition, literary criticism and book history, socio-economic history of the book, history of reading, state and the book, the book and scholarship. Theoretical assumptions, approaches and materials for exploring those topics are to be highlighted. Students will be evaluated by two assignments and a final essay.

Chinese History 116. Culture and Society in Late Imperial China - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 26117
Lianbin Dai
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
The central question examined in this course is what forces shaped continuity and discontinuity, both cultural and social, from the mid-eighth to the eighteenth centuries in China. What did a historical period inherit from the preceding one? And how did it distinguish itself from the earlier? The dynastic transition was not as decisive in the cultural and social (dis)continuity as might have been thought. Rather economy, society, and culture interacted with each other and developed largely independent from political powers. The students will be evaluated by a short essay and a final essay.

[Chinese History 185. The Historiography of the Middle Period]
Catalog Number: 41785
Peter K. Bol
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3.
The course this year will be devoted to creating modules for ChinaX, the new HarvardX course devoted to China’s history and culture from antiquity to the present. In addition to acquiring a general knowledge of China’s history, participants in the course will be actively involved in creating materials for the online course; including producing videos, creating structures for content development, choosing texts and images for online discussion and mark-up, and participating in debates and discussions that will be shown to a world-wide online audience. We hope to do these modules in both English and Chinese versions, but knowledge of Chinese language is not necessary to participate. As presently conceived the course will aim to produce fifteen modules covering topics from the 8th to the 18th century. Topics will include political and institutional history, poetry, novels and short stories, art, social and economic change, and international relations among others. It is possible that the scope will be extended forward and backward in time. This is not a lecture course. There is no final examination. Grades will be based on both a self-assessment and a review of contributions to the modules by peers and faculty.
Note: Expected to be given in 2016–17.

Cross-listed Courses

[Culture and Belief 26 (formerly Foreign Cultures 81). The Culture of Everyday Life in China]
Empirical and Mathematical Reasoning 21. Maps and Mapping
Ethical Reasoning 18 (formerly Moral Reasoning 78). Classical Chinese Ethical and Political Theory
Ethical Reasoning 20. Self, Serenity, and Vulnerability: West and East
*Freshman Seminar 46t. Rebels With a Cause: Tiananmen in History and Memory
*History 60c. The Nature of Modern China: Space, Science, and Environment - (New Course)
[*History 76c. Major Themes in World History: Colonialism, Imperialism, and Post-Colonialism]
*History 76g. Building the Modern Chinese Nation - (New Course)
*History 1918 (formerly History 1618). Telling Lives in Asia: Conference Course
Societies of the World 12 (formerly Historical Study A-13). China
[Societies of the World 37 (formerly Historical Study A-89). The Chinese Overseas]
Societies of the World 45 (formerly Chinese History 118). Beyond the Great Wall: China and the Nomadic Frontier

Primarily for Graduates

[Chinese History 200r. Computational Methods for Historical Analysis]
Catalog Number: 5606
Peter K. Bol
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
History takes place through the actions of people who live in time and space. Modern computational methods provide means of analyzing changes in patterns of behavior and thought among large numbers of people spread across many regions. This course introduces the use of GIS, relational databases, social network analysis, text-mining, and topic modeling for the analysis of geographic information, biographical data, and the content of texts. Separate labs will provide introductory instruction in various computational techniques.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Introductory meeting to be held Monday at 12 noon.

Chinese History 210. Late Imperial Chinese Elite Reading Practices and Knowledge Acquisition (the 16th - 18th Centuries): Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 83831
Lianbin Dai
Half course (spring term). F., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
Close reading of the texts selected from Fang Yizhi’s and his family’s writings. Students are expected to write a research essay on a topic of their choosing.

[Chinese History 224. Introduction to T’ang and Sung Historical Sources]
Catalog Number: 0673
Peter K. Bol
Half course (fall term). M., 1–4.
Introduction to the reading and interpretation of sources useful in the study of T’ang and Sung history. Recent scholarship and methodological issues are also discussed.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: One year of literary Chinese or equivalent.

Chinese History 225r. Topics in Song History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 90241
Xiaonan Deng
Half course (spring term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Examines various topics in the political, institutional and intellectual history of Song China. Brief introductions on the Song bureaucratic institutions. Close reading of the texts selected from Xu Weili documents. The students will be evaluated by an open-book test and a final essay.
Prerequisite: Communicating ability in modern Chinese and knowledge of literary Chinese.

[Chinese History 228. Introduction to Neo-Confucianism]
Catalog Number: 2130
Peter K. Bol
Half course (fall term). M., 1-4.
Introduces major Neo-Confucian texts for close reading and analysis. Selections from the writings and records of spoken instruction by Zhou Dunyi, Zhang Zai, Cheng Yi, Cheng Hao, Zhu Xi, Liu Jiuyuan, and others.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[Chinese History 229. Topics in Ming Intellectual History: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 23612
Peter K. Bol
Half course (spring term). M., 1–4.
Examines various topics in the intellectual and cultural history of Ming China.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of literary Chinese

[Chinese History 232r. Topics in Han History: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 7542
Michael J. Puett
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 17
Examines various topics in the history of the Han Dynasty.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Chinese History 233. Sources of Early Chinese History
Catalog Number: 85192
Michael J. Puett
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Chronological survey of recently-discovered paleographic texts and received materials from the late Shang through the early Warring States period, with discussion of problems of contextualization.

[Chinese History 234. The Historiography of Early Chinese History]
Catalog Number: 48777
Michael J. Puett
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
A study of major trends in the history of scholarship on early China. The main focus will be on 20th-century scholarship, but earlier developments will be introduced where relevant.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Chinese History 235r. Topics in Warring States History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 1499
Michael J. Puett
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
Close reading of texts from the Warring States period.

[Chinese History 253. Topics in Late Imperial History]
Catalog Number: 41366
Mark C. Elliott and Michael A. Szonyi
Half course (fall term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Review of historical scholarship on China from roughly 1500 to the early 20th century. This course is designed to aid in preparations for the general examinations and in developing a dissertation topic.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Chinese History 270a. Research Methods in Late Imperial Chinese History I: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 1863
Mark C. Elliott and Michael A. Szonyi
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–4.
Training in the use of a wide array of sources, methods, and reference tools for research in the history of late imperial China, focusing upon the reading and analysis of different types of Qing-era documents, official and unofficial. Students will write a research paper using documents provided in class. Reading knowledge of modern and literary Chinese required.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: Chinese 106b or equivalent in foundation literary Chinese.

Chinese History 270b (formerly Chinese History 264b). Research Methods in Late Imperial Chinese History II: Seminar
Catalog Number: 84929
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
Continued training in sources and methods for research in the history of late imperial China. Students will use original sources to write a research paper on a topic of their choosing.
Prerequisite: Chinese History 270a or consent of instructor.

Cross-listed Courses

[Anthropology 2092. Early China: Archaeology and Texts]
History 1602. China’s Long 20th Century - (New Course)
*History 1976 (formerly History 2620). Visible and Invisible Hands in China: State and Economy since 1800: Conference Course
*History 2300. Methods in Intellectual History: Proseminar
History of Art and Architecture 281p. Visual Programs in Early Chinese Art - (New Course)
History of Art and Architecture 284. Visual Programs in Medieval Chinese Art - (New Course)

China: Literature Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Chinese Literature 114 (formerly Foreign Cultures 68). Authority and the Claims of the Individual in Chinese Literary Culture]
Catalog Number: 9028
Xiaofei Tian
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Examines the role Chinese literary texts have played in articulating the place of the individual as part of, or against, the authority of community and state. Beginning with the celebrations of social integration in the early parts of the Classic of Poetry (early first millennium BC), we will follow the increasingly complex role literature came to play, both as a critic of authority and as establishing a domain of private life.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for either Foreign Cultures or Literature and Arts A, but not both.

[Chinese Literature 140. The Greatest Chinese Novel]
Catalog Number: 71999
Wai-yee Li
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
The Story of the Stone (also known as The Dream of the Red Chamber) by Cao Xueqin (1715?-1763) is widely recognized as the masterpiece of Chinese fiction. It is also a portal to Chinese civilization. Encyclopedic in scope, this book both sums up Chinese culture and asks of it difficult questions. Its cult status also accounts for modern popular screen and television adaptations. Through a close examination of this text in conjunction with supplementary readings and visual materials, the seminar will explore a series of topics on Chinese culture, including foundational myths, philosophical and religious systems, the status of fiction, conceptions of art and the artist, ideas about love, desire and sexuality, gender roles, garden aesthetics, family and clan structure, and definitions of socio-political order.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

Cross-listed Courses

For related courses, see also China: Language Courses section.
Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 39. Reinventing Literary China: Old Tales Retold in Modern Times
Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 47. Forbidden Romance in Modern China
[Culture and Belief 40 (formerly Foreign Cultures 67). Popular Culture and Modern China]
*Freshman Seminar 32q. Introduction to Traditional Asian Drama Texts - (New Course)

Primarily for Graduates

[Chinese Literature 200. Research Methods in Pre-modern Chinese Literature--Proseminar ]
Catalog Number: 2533
Stephen Owen
Half course (spring term). Th., 1–4.
An introduction to the use of Western and East Asian sources in literary research, including both print and digital media. In addition, one hour each week will be devoted to a basic text in literary theory.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Primarily for first- and second-year graduate students (MA or PhD).

[Chinese Literature 201a. History of Chinese Literature: Beginnings through Song]
Catalog Number: 0165
Xiaofei Tian
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–4.
In-depth, scholarly introduction to history of Chinese literature and literary culture from antiquity through 1400. Also examines state of the field and considers issues for future research. Includes bibliography. Essential for generals preparation.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Chinese Literature 223r. Keywords - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 22565
Wai-yee Li
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
This course will examine the semantic range of keywords in early Chinese texts (up to Han) by considering their narrative and rhetorical possibilities. What kinds of arguments do they generate? What are the stories told to illustrate their meanings?

Chinese Literature 229r. Topics in Early Medieval Literature
Catalog Number: 6099
Xiaofei Tian
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Th., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16, 17
Topic for fall term is poetry and poetics from the late Eastern Han through Sui. Spring term topic: The fall of the South in mid-sixth century and the subsequent displacement of many southerners to north China was a traumatic event for Southern Dynasties elite. We will discuss the writing of trauma, diaspora and nostalgia in this period with focus on the use of poetry as a medium of writing the history of self and state.

Chinese Literature 231. Late-Ming Literature and Culture
Catalog Number: 2770
Wai-yee Li
Half course (fall term). W., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
Surveys writings from second half of sixteenth century until fall of Ming, including prose (including “informal essays”), poetry, drama, fiction. Examines late-Ming literary-aesthetic sensibility (and questions how such a category may be justified.)
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of classical and pre-modern vernacular Chinese required.

Chinese Literature 245r. Topics in Sinophone Studies - Modern Chinese Fiction on the Periphery
Catalog Number: 0321
David Der-Wei Wang
Half course (fall term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Survey of modern Chinese fiction and narratology from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese Diaspora: polemics of the canon, dialogues between national and regional imaginaries, and literary cultures in the Sinophone world.

[Chinese Literature 247. Chinese Lyricism and Modernity: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 8098
David Der-Wei Wang
Half course (fall term). M., 2–4.
Explores lyricism as an overlooked discourse in modern Chinese literature and culture. Looks into lyrical representations in poetic, narrative, and performative terms and re-defines the polemics of "the lyrical" in the making of Chinese modernities.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[Chinese Literature 248. Modern Chinese Literature: Theory and Practice: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 9486
David Der-Wei Wang
Half course (fall term). M., 2–4.
Survey of the concepts, institutions, canons, debates, experiments, and actions that gave rise to, and continually redefined, modern Chinese literature. Equal attention given to theories drawn from Chinese and Western traditions.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Chinese Literature 258. Encounters between Tradition and Modernity in Chinese Literature: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 14688
Xiaofei Tian and David Der-Wei Wang
Half course (spring term). M., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
In this course we will read a series of important Chinese texts from past to present and explore the complicated and nuanced ways in which modern literary culture responds to and negotiates with the classical tradition. Whether inheriting or disinheriting traditional resources, the present is intimately intertwined with the past, in its ingenious appropriations or impassioned negation.
Prerequisite: Reading proficiency in Literary Chinese is helpful but not required.

Chinese Literature 267r. Topics in Tang Literature: Seminar
Catalog Number: 8521
Stephen Owen
Half course (spring term). W., 1–4.
A survey of the three centuries of Tang literature, with special attention to critical issues arising in the study of Tang literature. The topic this term will be Tang stories.
Prerequisite: Two years of literary Chinese or equivalent.

Chinese Literature 268r. Topics in Song and Yuan Literature: Seminar
Catalog Number: 7143
Stephen Owen
Half course (fall term). M., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
The topic this semester will be Northern Song prose and classical poetry.
Prerequisite: Two years of literary Chinese or equivalent.

Chinese Literature 280. Shanghai and Beijing: A Tale of Two Cities: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 78971
Jie Li
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
This course aims to excavate the cultural and historical memories of China’s two most important cities. We will discuss literary and cinematic representations, visual and material transformations of the cityscape, cities as sites of cultural production, and the lives of their inhabitants in modern times.

Cross-listed Courses

[Comparative Literature 277. Literature and Diaspora]
[History of Art and Architecture 280p. Voices in Chinese Painting]

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Chinese 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 4849
Peter K. Bol 8014 (on leave spring term), Mark C. Elliott 3329, Wilt L. Idema 2511, Wai-yee Li 3357, Stephen Owen 7418, Michael J. Puett 1227, Michael A. Szonyi 4842 (on leave 2013-14), Xiaofei Tian 3746, and David Der-Wei Wang 5190

Japan: Language Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Japanese Ba. Elementary Japanese
Catalog Number: 2014
Yuko Kageyama-Hunt
Half course (fall term). Sections M., W., F., at 9, 10, or 1, and two additional hours to be arranged for Tu. and Th. EXAM GROUP: 2
This course aims to develop a basic foundation in modern Japanese leading to proficiency in the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on the use of these skills to communicate effectively in authentic contexts of daily life. Mastery of hiragana, katakana, and approximately 45 Kanji (Chinese characters).

Japanese Bb. Elementary Japanese
Catalog Number: 8728
Yuko Kageyama-Hunt
Half course (spring term). Sections M., W., F., at 9, 10, or 1, and two additional hours to be arranged for Tu. and Th. EXAM GROUP: 2
Continuation of Japanese Ba, with an approximately 135 additional Kanji.
Prerequisite: Japanese Ba or equivalent.

Japanese 106a. Classical Japanese
Catalog Number: 1492
Edwin A. Cranston
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Introduction to classical grammar and texts.
Prerequisite: Japanese 130b.

[Japanese 106b. Kambun]
Catalog Number: 2602
Edwin A. Cranston
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 11.
Introduction to Kambun.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Japanese 106a or equivalent.

[Japanese 106c. Later Classical Japanese]
Catalog Number: 7307
Edwin A. Cranston
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 11.
Post-Heian writings in Classical Japanese.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Japanese 106a or equivalent.

Japanese 120a. Intermediate Japanese I
Catalog Number: 8152
Ikue Shingu
Half course (fall term). Sections M., T., W., Th., F., at 10 and 2. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Second-year intermediate level course aimed at consolidation of the basic grammatical patterns of Japanese and development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills to the level necessary for communication in everyday life in Japanese society. Introduction of approximately 150 Chinese characters beyond those introduced in Bb.
Prerequisite: Japanese Bb or equivalent.

Japanese 120b. Intermediate Japanese I
Catalog Number: 6433
Ikue Shingu
Half course (spring term). Sections M., T., W., Th., and F., at 10 or 2. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Continuation of Japanese 120a. Approximately 150 additional Chinese characters.

Japanese 130a. Intermediate Japanese II
Catalog Number: 4855
Miki Yagi
Half course (fall term). Sections M., T., W., Th., F., at 10, or 2 . EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Third-year intermediate advanced course. Development of skills in reading authentic materials from contemporary Japanese media and fiction and in aural comprehension of contemporary television news and drama with decreased reliance on pedagogical aids. Development of speaking and writing skills to an increasingly sophisticated level. Introduction of approximately 200 additional Chinese characters beyond those introduced in 120b.
Prerequisite: Japanese 120b or equivalent.

Japanese 130b. Intermediate Japanese II
Catalog Number: 6904
Miki Yagi
Half course (spring term). M., through F., at 10, or 2. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Continuation of Japanese 130a. Approximately 200 additional Chinese characters.

Japanese 140a. Advanced Modern Japanese
Catalog Number: 3688
Yasuko Matsumoto
Half course (fall term). Sections: M. through F., at 10 or 1. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Readings of modern texts in both rapid and in-depth modes. Comprehension of media news and drama. Advanced conversation and composition on topics related to the preceding.
Prerequisite: Japanese 130b.

Japanese 140b. Advanced Modern Japanese
Catalog Number: 8551
Yasuko Matsumoto
Half course (spring term). Sections: M. through F., at 10 or 1. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Continuation of Japanese 140a.

Japanese 150a. Readings and Discussion in Japanese Social Sciences
Catalog Number: 4693
Yasuko Matsumoto
Half course (fall term). M.,W., F. at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2
Selected readings and discussion in Japanese primarily on contemporary topics in economics, sociology, political science, psychology, and cultural studies, with occasional readings from literature. Readings are supplemented by selections from audiovisual media on current social issues.
Note: Conducted in Japanese.
Prerequisite: Japanese 140b.

Japanese 150b. Readings and Discussion in Japanese Social Sciences
Catalog Number: 0984
Yasuko Matsumoto
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2
Continuation of Japanese 150a.
Prerequisite: Japanese 150a.

Cross-listed Courses

[Linguistics 173. Linguistic Issues in Japanese]
[Linguistics 174. Tense and Aspect in Japanese]
Linguistics 176. History and Prehistory of the Japanese Language

Primarily for Graduates

Japanese 210a. Reading Scholarly Japanese for Students of Chinese and Korean
Catalog Number: 9182
Wesley M. Jacobsen
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2
Development of skills in reading and translating academic genres of Japanese, with special attention to Japanese scholarship on Chinese and Korean studies. Introduction to old kana usage and classical forms commonly used in scholarly writing.
Prerequisite: Japanese 120b, and graduate standing in some field of Chinese or Korean studies.

Japanese 210b. Reading Scholarly Japanese for Students of Chinese and Korean
Catalog Number: 8918
Wesley M. Jacobsen
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2
Continuation of Japanese 210a.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2010–11.
Prerequisite: Japanese 210a.

Japan: History Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Japanese History 115. Religion and Society in Edo and Meiji Japan]
Catalog Number: 5756
Helen Hardacre
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3.
Examination of religion and society in Japan from 1600-1912, beginning with an era of state control over religious institutions and religious affiliations of the populace, followed by the demise of the Edo-period system and diversification of religious practice in context of rapid social change, modernization, and imperialism during the Meiji period. Separate section for students able to utilize primary sources in Japanese will explore the Maruzen Meiji Microfilm collection in the Harvard-Yenching Library.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3957.
Prerequisite: General knowledge of Japanese history and religion is helpful.

[Japanese History 117. Japanese Folk Religion: Conference Course]
Catalog Number: 65798
Helen Hardacre
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3.
This conference course is an introduction to the study of Japanese folk religion, popular religious life carried on largely outside the frameworks of Buddhism, Shinto, and other religious institutions. The course aims to interrogate the idea of folk religion and its viability as a field of study within Japanese religions and within contemporary society. In its first half, the course examines the traditional rubrics and topics in the literature on Japanese folk religion. In the second half, the course turns to changes in folk religious life brought about through tourism and the appropriation of folk religious motifs by such contemporary media forms as animé and manga.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Japanese History 120. Religion and Society in Twentieth-Century Japan
Catalog Number: 4903
Helen Hardacre
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
An examination of religion and society from the end of the Meiji period (1912) to the present. This course explores the meaning of the modern in Japanese religions, the development of the public sphere and religion’s relations with it, religion and nationalism, and the interconnections of religion and social change with materialism, consumerism, pacifism, and spiritualism.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3958.
Prerequisite: General knowledge of Japanese history and religion is helpful. Enrollment in Japanese History 115 recommended but not required.

[Japanese History 126. Shinto: Conference Course]
Catalog Number: 3097
Helen Hardacre
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3.
An examination of Shinto, emphasizing its concepts of deity (kami), patterns of ritual and festival, shrines as religious and social institutions, political culture and interactions with party politics, and its contribution to contemporary youth culture.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. General knowledge of Japanese history and religion is helpful. Japanese language is not required, but several meetings will be held for students able to use Japanese-language sources. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3960.

[Japanese History 130. The History of Curiosity and the Curiosities of Edo Japan]
Catalog Number: 4445 Enrollment: Limited to 30.
Shigehisa Kuriyama
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course probes the nature and history of curiosity by exploring the strangely, extravagantly, intensely curious culture that was Japan in the Edo period (1600-1868), and spotlighting its entwinement with outsiders who were intensely curious about it. The design of the course is unique: crafted as an intellectual adventure game, it presupposes no prior knowledge, but will require keen curiosity and a willingness to experiment with new technologies of learning. In addition to students of Japanese culture, it should particularly interest those fascinated by global connections, early modern science, and the mystery of curiosity.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

Cross-listed Courses

Culture and Belief 57. Animated Spirituality: Japanese Religion in Anime, Manga, and Film - (New Course)
[*History 76a. Japanese Imperialism and the East Asian Modern]
History of Art and Architecture 18j. Introduction to Japanese Architecture - (New Course)
History of Art and Architecture 18k. Introduction to Japanese Art
Societies of the World 13 (formerly Historical Study A-14). Japan in Asia and the World
[Societies of the World 33 (formerly Foreign Cultures 84). Tokyo]
Societies of the World 43 (formerly Historical Study B-67). Japan’s Samurai Revolution

Primarily for Graduates

Japanese History 240. Museum Research in Japanese Art: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 74246
Melissa M. McCormick and Ryuichi Abe
Half course (spring term). Th., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
Examines works in the Harvard Art Museums in art historical, literary, and religious context. The Spring 2014 seminar will focus on medieval Buddhist art and illustrated scrolls about the Shingon sect and its founder Kūkai.

Japanese History 256. The Ise Shrines: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 27559
Helen Hardacre and Yukio Lippit
Half course (fall term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
This seminar examines Shikinen Sengu, the practice of rebuilding the Ise Grand Shrines every twenty years, addressing these shrines’ history, architecture, religious practices, and related topics. Course readings will be in English and Japanese.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3227.

Japanese History 260r. Topics in Japanese Cultural History
Catalog Number: 4539
Shigehisa Kuriyama
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
In 2013-14, the course will focus on the interplay of pictures and texts in Edo Japan in a wide variety of genres, including natural history, shunga, popular literature, how-to manuals, and advertisements. In addition to training students in the cultural analysis of printed illustrations, the course will also help students develop facility in reading hentaigana materials.
Prerequisite: Advanced reading knowledge of Japanese with some acquaintance with (or at least concurrent study of) bungo and kambun.

Japanese History 270. Early Modern Japanese History: Proseminar
Catalog Number: 85593
David Howell
Half course (fall term). F., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
This seminar surveys the recent English-language literature on the history of early modern Japan, roughly from the late sixteenth century to around 1875.

Japanese History 271r (formerly Japanese History 271). Research in Early Modern Japanese History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 49178
David Howell
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17, 18
This seminar deals with the politics, society, and culture of Japan from the late sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. Readings will include primary and secondary sources in Japanese and English. Students will write a major research paper.

Cross-listed Courses

*History 2651. Japanese History: Seminar
History 2653. Historiography of Modern Japan: Proseminar
History of Art and Architecture 288y. Tohaku on Painting - (New Course)

Japan: Literature Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Japanese Literature 124. The Tale of Genji in Word and Image
Catalog Number: 2181
Melissa M. McCormick
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3.
Introduces students to The Tale of Genji, often called the world’s first novel, authored by the court lady Murasaki Shikibu around the year 1000 CE. In addition to a close reading of the tale, topics for examination include Japanese court culture, women’s writing, and the tale’s afterlife in painting, prints, drama, manga, and film.

Japanese Literature 128a. The World of Classical Japanese Literature - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 91163
Matthew Fraleigh
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
This course will introduce students to some of the most artistically significant, historically influential and culturally celebrated works of Japanese literature from the classical period.

Japanese Literature 128b. The World of Early Modern Japanese Literature - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 18835
Matthew Fraleigh
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
This class will survey some of the most celebrated works of literature from Japan’s early modern period (1600-1868).

Japanese Literature 133. Gender and Japanese Art
Catalog Number: 2144
Melissa M. McCormick
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
Examines the role of gender in the production, reception, and interpretation of visual images in Japan from the twelfth through the twenty-first centuries. Topics include Buddhist conceptions of the feminine and Buddhist painting; sexual identity and illustrated narratives of gender reversals; the dynamics of voyeurism in Ukiyo-e woodblock prints; modernization of images of "modern girls" in the 1920s; and the gender dynamics of girl culture in manga and anime.

[Japanese Literature 162. Girl Culture, Media, and Japan]
Catalog Number: 27841
Tomiko Yoda
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
The course examines the ways in which girlhood and girl culture have figured in the construction of gender, nation, and popular medias in modern to contemporary Japan. We will study visual and textual mediums, including novels, magazines, films, manga, and animation, paying attention to principal transformations that have marked the history of modern girl culture in Japan. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or history is expected.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for either Foreign Cultures or Literature and Arts C, but not both.

Cross-listed Courses

[Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 53 (formerly Japanese Literature 161). Anime as Global Popular Culture]

Primarily for Graduates

Japanese Literature 230. Literature of Travel in Early Modern and Modern Japan - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 51966
Matthew Fraleigh
Half course (spring term). F., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
This seminar closely examines a diverse range of Japanese travel literature from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. The readings have been chosen to reflect the breadth and variety of Japanese travelogues from the period.

Japanese Literature 233r. Nara and Heian Court Literature: Seminar
Catalog Number: 8614
Edwin A. Cranston
Half course (fall term). W., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
Topic: Genji Monogatari.
Prerequisite: Japanese 106a or equivalent.

Japanese Literature 240. Chinese Poetry in Early Modern Japan: Seminar - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 98242
Matthew Fraleigh
Half course (fall term). F., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
This seminar focuses on Chinese poetic forms in Japanese literary history of the early modern period.

[Japanese Literature 270. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Japanese Fiction: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 10263
Tomiko Yoda
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4:30.
A seminar course on the history, theory, and practice of modern to contemporary Japanese fiction. The course will be organized around a specific theme, time period, a cluster of writers, critics, or genres.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Japanese Literature 271. Topics in Gender and Culture in Japan: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 76892
Tomiko Yoda
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4:30.
A seminar course that studies the constructions of gender and gender relations in Japan through the examination of various forms of expressive culture (visual, textual, sonic) in their historical contexts.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Cross-listed Courses

[Comparative Literature 277. Literature and Diaspora]

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Japanese 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 4627
Ryuichi Abe 4974, Edwin A. Cranston 1186 (on leave spring term), Andrew Gordon 1891, Helen Hardacre 3191, Wesley M. Jacobsen 3443, Shigehisa Kuriyama 5269, Satomi Matsumura 2665 (on leave fall term), Melissa M. McCormick 5331, and Tomiko Yoda 6301 (on leave 2013-14)

Korea: Language Courses

Primarily for Undergraduates

*Korean 91r. Supervised Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 79216
Sang-suk Oh
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Independent reading and research in Korean Language.
Note: Open to students who have completed Korean 150b and given evidence of ability to do independent reading and research. May be taken on an individual basis or by small groups of students interested in working on the same topic.
Prerequisite: Korean 150b and permission of course head.

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Korean Ba. Elementary Korean
Catalog Number: 8739
Sang-suk Oh
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4
Introduction to modern Korean: basic grammar, reading of simple texts, conversational skills, and writing short letters. After successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to handle a limited number of interactive, task-oriented, and social situations and to have sufficient control of the writing system to interpret written language in areas of practical needs.

Korean Bb. Elementary Korean
Catalog Number: 8718
Sang-suk Oh
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 11, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4
Continuation of Korean Ba.
Prerequisite: Korean Ba or equivalent.

Korean Bxa. Elementary Korean for Advanced Beginners
Catalog Number: 0120
Heeyeong Jung
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Designed for students with some listening and speaking background, either from prior formal learning or previous exposure to a Korean speaking community. Introductory Korean course, with emphasis on reading and writing. After successful completion of this course, students are expected be able to understand main ideas and/or some facts from the simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs and to be able to meet a number of practical writing needs.

Korean Bxb. Elementary Korean for Advanced Beginners
Catalog Number: 3031
Heeyeong Jung
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10; Tu., Th., at 1. EXAM GROUP: 3
Continuation of Korean Bxa.

Korean 120a. Intermediate Korean
Catalog Number: 5884
Hee-Jeong Jeong
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Continuation of elementary Korean to consolidate students’ knowledge of the fundamental grammatical structures of Korean with an aim to increase their abilities to communicate using Korean in a wide range of daily-life transactional situations. After successful completion of second-year Korean, students are expected to handle most uncomplicated communicative tasks and social situations and read consistently with understanding of simple connected texts dealing with personal and social needs.
Prerequisite: Korean Bb or equivalent.

Korean 120b. Intermediate Korean
Catalog Number: 8590
Hee-Jeong Jeong
Half course (spring term). M. through F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11
Continuation of Korean 120a.
Prerequisite: Korean 120a or equivalent.

Korean 130a. Pre-advanced Korean
Catalog Number: 2071
Heeyeong Jung
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 1 and Drill T., Th., 9, and a weekly section to be arranged.
Continuation of intermediate Korean, to consolidate the student’s knowledge of the grammatical structures of Korean with an aim to increase their abilities to communicate using Korean in a wide range of familiar and everyday topics, current societal events, and factual and concrete topics relating to personal interests. After successful completion of third-year Korean, students are expected to be able to describe and narrate about concrete and factual topics of personal and general interest.
Prerequisite: Korean 120b or equivalent.

Korean 130b. Pre-advanced Korean
Catalog Number: 2662
Heeyeong Jung
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1; Th., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 6
Continuation of Korean 130a.
Prerequisite: Korean 130a or equivalent.

Korean 140a. Advanced Korean
Catalog Number: 5723
Hee-Jeong Jeong
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 2:30–4:30. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Development of skills in reading materials from contemporary Korean media and fiction and in aural comprehension of contemporary television news and drama with decreased reliance on pedagogical aids. After successful completion of fourth-year Korean, students should be able to satisfy the requirements of various everyday school, and work situations and follow essential points of written discourse which are abstract and linguistically complex, and also to write about a variety of topics in detail with precision.
Prerequisite: Korean 130b or equivalent.

Korean 140b. Advanced Korean
Catalog Number: 3011
Hee-Jeong Jeong
Half course (spring term). M., W., 12-2. EXAM GROUP: 5, 6
Continuation of Korean 140a.
Prerequisite: Korean 140a or equivalent.

Korean 150a. Readings in Cultural Studies
Catalog Number: 1936
Sang-suk Oh
Half course (fall term). W., 3-6 with two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Selected readings in contemporary Korean on topics in art, film, drama, and cultural studies, supplemented by selections from audio-visual media on traditional and current cultural events. After completion of Korean 150a and 150b, students are expected to be able to participate in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, professional, and abstract topics and read with almost complete comprehension and at normal speed expository prose on unfamiliar subjects and a variety of literary texts.
Prerequisite: Korean 140b or equivalent.

Korean 150b. Readings in Cultural Studies
Catalog Number: 1282
Sang-suk Oh
Half course (spring term). W., 3–6, with one additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Continuation of Korean 150a.
Prerequisite: Korean 140b or equivalent.

Korea: History Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Korean History 111. Traditional Korea]
Catalog Number: 3709
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
Survey of the history of Korea, from earliest times to the 19th century. Examines various interpretive approaches and issues in the political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and diplomatic history of premodern Korea.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[Korean History 115. Korean History Through Film]
Catalog Number: 20477
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (spring term). M., 3–6. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
This course is to examine history of premodern Korea through select Korea’s contemporary feature films. Films and dramas with historical themes and personages have been very popular in Korea. We will examine the content of the films, and investigate how “true” or “false” they represent Korea’s past, how they imagine and invent Korea’s past, in what ways films are useful in better understanding Korean history, people’s lives and practices.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. A discussion section in the Korean language will be offered if enrollment is sufficient.

[Korean History 130. The Recurring Past--Early Korea and Northeast Asia as History and Identity]
Catalog Number: 40272
Mark Edward Byington
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11.
With a focus on Korea’s proto-historic and early historic periods, this course will explore the question of history as shaper of identity, looking at the ways the remote past surfaces repeatedly in modern context. We will examine international disputes over historical interpretation, the popularization of the ancient past in popular culture, and the politicization of history in both North and South Korea.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Cross-listed Courses

Societies of the World 27 (formerly Historical Study A-75). The Two Koreas

Primarily for Graduates

Korean History 230r. Readings in Premodern Korean History
Catalog Number: 4497
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
A study of social, political, economic, and intellectual history of premodern Korea reviewing major scholarship in the field. Designed primarily for graduate students preparing for the general examination. All readings are in English.
Prerequisite: Korean History 111 or equivalent.

[Korean History 231ar. Documents and Research Methods for the Study of Premodern Korea I: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 56199
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3.
Introduction of the different types of primary sources and research methodologies useful for study of Chôson Korea. Students are required to write a research paper.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Korean History 111 or equivalent and reading proficiency in Korean. Reading ability in literary Chinese and Japanese helpful.

[Korean History 231b. Documents and Research Methods for the Study of Premodern Korea II: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 91032
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3.
Continued training in reading and interpreting primary sources and exploring innovative research methodologies. Students are required to write a research paper based on original sources on a topic of their choosing.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Korean History 231a or instructor’s permission.

[Korean History 235r. Historical Research in Korea ]
Catalog Number: 7886
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (spring term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Explores current historical research in the field of premodern Korea by reviewing major publications in the field in Korean.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Korean History 111 or equivalent and proficiency in Korean.

Korean History 240r. Selected Topics in Premodern Korean History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 9837
Sun Joo Kim
Half course (spring term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Reading and research of selected primary sources and secondary works on premodern Korean history.
Prerequisite: Korean History 111 or equivalent and reading proficiency in Korean. Reading ability in classical Chinese and Japanese helpful.

Korean History 253. Modern Korean History: Proseminar
Catalog Number: 0365
Carter J. Eckert
Half course (fall term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
An introduction to some of the current issues in modern Korean history through selected readings. Designed for entering graduate students and undergraduates with a basic knowledge of modern Korean History (Societies of the World 27, “Two Koreas” or its equivalent).

[*Korean History 255r. Modern Korean History: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 0713
Carter J. Eckert
Full course (indivisible). Th., 2–4.
Readings and research in modern Korean history. Students are required to write a seminar paper based largely on primary materials
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Korean History 253 or equivalent, and reading proficiency in Korean.

Korean History 260r. Readings in Modern Korean History I
Catalog Number: 5372
Carter J. Eckert
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Explores the history of the field through an examination of major scholarship. Designed primarily for graduate students preparing for the general examination.

Korean History 261. Readings in Modern Korean History II
Catalog Number: 79753
Carter J. Eckert
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Continuation of Korean History 260. Designed primarily for graduate students preparing for the general examination.

[Korean History 270. Readings in Early Korean and Northeast Asian History: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 55379
Mark Edward Byington
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–4.
This course involves close readings in various topics related to early Korean History, reinforcing the view of early Korea as an active component in a very dynamic East Asian cultural matrix.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Reading proficiency in classical Chinese and one of either Korean, Chinese or Japanese.

Korea: Literature Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Korean Literature 132. Korean Literature in Translation: Conference Course]
Catalog Number: 7838
David McCann
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30, additional evening screenings to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
This course provides a comprehensive overview of Korean culture as it is represented in Korean fiction and poetry from pre-modern to contemporary period. It delves into the question of how Korea, as a society and nation, has responded to cultural transformations and changing conceptions of the land, the people, and the nation over time. The course highlights different genres of Korean literature from mythologies of Korea’s birth, literary works in Japanese written under Colonial Korea, to contemporary pop culture and literature in films. The concepts of state, gender, class, nostalgia, modernity, and revolutionary aesthetics will be at the forefront of our discussions.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. This course will include an exam.
Prerequisite: All readings will be in English. No prior knowledge of Korea or the Korean language is required.

Cross-listed Courses

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 35. Forms in Korean Cultural History

Primarily for Graduates

[Korean Literature 210r. Pre-Modern Korean Literature]
Catalog Number: 6342
David McCann
Half course (fall term). Th., 1–3.
Close reading in a number of literary forms, including the essay, histories, prose fiction, songs, poetry, and p’ansori.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Readings in English and Korean.
Prerequisite: Korean Literature 132 or equivalent.

Korean Literature 212. Modern Korean Poetry
Catalog Number: 5627
David McCann
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Major and minor voices in 20th and 21st-century Korean poetry. Attention to the practices of reading and translation, and to the political contexts of modern Korean poetry.
Note: Readings in English and Korean.
Prerequisite: Korean Literature 132 or equivalent.

Cross-listed Courses

[Comparative Literature 277. Literature and Diaspora]

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Korean 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 8122
Carter J. Eckert 1178, Sun Joo Kim 3821, David McCann 3635 (on leave spring term), and Sang-suk Oh 3856

Manchu: Language Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

[Manchu A. Elementary Manchu]
Catalog Number: 8961
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
Introduction to Manchu grammar with elementary readings in Manchu script.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Manchu B. Elementary Manchu]
Catalog Number: 1625
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
Readings in a variety of historical and literary texts with emphasis on Manchu documentary sources.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Manchu 120a. Intermediate Manchu
Catalog Number: 4190
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Readings in a wide variety of Manchu texts. English to Manchu translation exercises.

Manchu 120b. Advanced Manchu
Catalog Number: 1414
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). F., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
Intensive reading in Manchu archival materials, other historical texts and literary texts. Some texts in pre-diacritical form. English to Manchu translation exercises.

Primarily for Graduates

Manchu 210b. Introduction to Sources for Manchu Studies
Catalog Number: 4146
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). W., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
Research papers prepared on the basis of primary sources.
Prerequisite: Manchu 210a.

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Manchu 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 8735
Mark C. Elliott 3329

Mongolian: Language Courses

Primarily for Undergraduates

Mongolian A. Elementary Written Mongolian
Catalog Number: 2965
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Study of classical Mongolian grammar, with introduction to pre-classical and classical Mongolian texts.

Mongolian B. Elementary Written Mongolian
Catalog Number: 8489
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Continuation of Mongolian A.

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Mongolian 120a. Intermediate Written Mongolian
Catalog Number: 0810
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Readings in classical and modern Mongolian texts.

Mongolian 120b. Advanced Written Mongolian
Catalog Number: 4032
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Continuation of Mongolian 120a.

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Mongolian 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 1345
Mark C. Elliott 3329

Tibetan and Himalayan Studies

Tibetan History

Cross-listed Courses

History of Art and Architecture 18s. Arts of South and Southeast Asia
History of Art and Architecture 183k. Himalayan Art - (New Course)
History of Art and Architecture 285m. South Asian Temple : Theory and Practice
Religion 1705 (Buddhism in Tibet). Tibetan Religions
Tibetan 91r. Supervised Reading and Research
Tibetan 101a. Elementary Classical Tibetan
Tibetan 101b. Elementary Classical Tibetan
Tibetan 102a. Intermediate Classical Tibetan
Tibetan 102b. Intermediate Classical Tibetan
Tibetan 104ar. Elementary Colloquial Tibetan
Tibetan 104br. Elementary Colloquial Tibetan
Tibetan 105ar. Intermediate Colloquial Tibetan
Tibetan 106ar. Advanced Colloquial Tibetan
Tibetan 106br. Advanced Colloquial Tibetan
Tibetan 219r. Tibetan Religious Literature: Seminar
[Tibetan 235. Introduction in reading traditional Tibetan archival (yig tshags) and government documents (gzhung yig) ]
*Tibetan 300. Reading and Research
*Tibetan 302. Direction of AM Theses

Uyghur: Language Courses

Primarily for Undergraduates

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Uyghur A. Elementary Uyghur
Catalog Number: 8767
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2
Introduction to Uyghur, the Turkic language spoken in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and throughout Central Asia. Course covers grammar, reading and writing (in the modified Arabic alphabet adopted in the PRC), and conversation practice.

Uyghur B. Elementary Uyghur
Catalog Number: 5271
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 4. EXAM GROUP: 9
Continuation of Uyghur A. Completion of basic Uyghur grammar, listening and speaking practice with the aid of audio-visual materials, selected readings from Uyghur literature and academic prose.

[Uyghur 120A. Intermediate/Advanced Uyghur]
Catalog Number: 9312
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 8:30–10.
Additional training in modern Uyghur, with attention to improvement of spoken fluency and comprehension. Extensive readings in a range of genres, including historical writing and academic prose as well as religious texts.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Uyghur B or permission of instructor.

[Uyghur 120B. Intermediate/Advanced Uyghur]
Catalog Number: 4234
Mark C. Elliott
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 8:30–10.
Continuation of Uyghur 120A.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.
Prerequisite: Uyghur 120A or permission of instructor.

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Uyghur 300. Readings in Uyghur Language and Literature
Catalog Number: 5357
Mark C. Elliott 3329
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Guided readings in advanced Uyghur-language texts. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Uyghur 120B or permission of instructor.

Vietnam: Language Courses

For Undergraduates and Graduates

Vietnamese Ba. Elementary Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 3873
Binh Ngo
Half course (fall term). M. through F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11
Surveys the fundamentals of Vietnamese phonetics, grammar, and vocabulary to provide students with basic ability to understand, speak, read, and write Vietnamese. Conversational ability is stressed through an interactive, communication-oriented approach.

Vietnamese Bb. Elementary Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 9940
Binh Ngo
Half course (spring term). M. through F., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11
Continuation of Vietnamese Ba, with introduction of additional Vietnamese texts and excerpts from Vietnamese newspapers to enhance reading skills.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese Ba or permission of the instructor.

Vietnamese 120a. Intermediate Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 3276
Binh Ngo
Half course (fall term). Lecture M., 4-6, Drill W., 4-6.
Further development of speaking, reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Texts and dialogues on Vietnamese geography, history, culture, and customs will be used, as well as audiotapes and videos. Students are expected to speak Vietnamese in all class discussions.
Note: Conducted entirely in Vietnamese.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese Bb or permission of instructor.

Vietnamese 120b. Intermediate Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 6178
Binh Ngo
Half course (spring term). M., W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
Continuation of Vietnamese 120a.
Note: Conducted entirely in Vietnamese.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese 120a or permission of instructor.

Vietnamese 130a. Advanced Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 6287
Binh Ngo
Half course (fall term). Lecture T., 3-5, Drill Th., 3-5. EXAM GROUP: 17
Development of high proficiency in Vietnamese. Introduction of complex grammar and vocabulary, using authentic Vietnamese texts, videos, and translation of English news articles into Vietnamese. Discussions focus on selected short stories and poems.
Note: Conducted entirely in Vietnamese.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese 120b or permission of instructor.

Vietnamese 130b. Advanced Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 3968
Binh Ngo
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 3-5, and one additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 17, 18
Continuation of Vietnamese 130a.
Note: Conducted entirely in Vietnamese.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese 130a or permission of instructor.

Vietnamese 140a. Advanced-High Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 97175
Binh Ngo
Half course (fall term). M., W., 2:30–4.
Development of near-native fluency in oral and written expression. Modern Vietnamese literature, including short stories, excerpts from novels, and poems in the original, that were published in Vietnam from the 1930s to the present day is used to introduce the complex grammar, idioms, proverbs and some slang expressions commonly used in contemporary Vietnamese. Discussion focuses on Vietnamese culture and issues related to Vietnamese society during that period.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese 130b

Vietnamese 140b. Advanced-High Vietnamese
Catalog Number: 45653
Binh Ngo
Half course (spring term). M., W., 2:30–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Continuation of Vietnamese 140a.
Prerequisite: Vietnamese 140a

Vietnam: History Courses

Cross-listed Courses

History 1063 (formerly History 1963). America and Vietnam: 1945-1975
[History 1619. Premodern Vietnam]
History 1620. Modern Vietnam
*History 1918 (formerly History 1618). Telling Lives in Asia: Conference Course

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*Vietnamese 300. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 7211
Binh Ngo 1383