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Expository Writing

Standing Committee on Undergraduate Educational Policy

Donald H. Pfister, Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany, Curator of the Farlow Library and Herbarium, and Interim Dean of Harvard College (Chair) (on leave spring term)
Michael J. Aziz, Gene and Tracy Sykes Professor of Materials and Energy Technologies
Noël Bisson, Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education
Jeremy Bloxham, Mallinckrodt Professor of Geophysics, Dean of Science
Jonathan H. Bolton, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Jay M. Harris, Harry Austryn Wolfson Professor of Jewish Studies and Dean of Undergraduate Education
Stephanie H. Kenen, Administrative Director of the Program in General Education and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education
Mary D. Lewis, Professor of History
Peter V. Marsden, Edith and Benjamin Geisinger Professor of Sociology and Dean of Social Science
Melissa M. McCormick, Professor of Japanese Art and Culture
Xiao-Li Meng, Whipple V.N. Jones Professor of Statistics, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Cherry Murray, John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Professor of Physics, and Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
John H. Shaw, Harry C. Dudley Professor of Structural and Economic Geology
Michael D. Smith, John H. Finley, Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Diana Sorensen, James F. Rothenberg Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of Comparative Literature, and Dean of Arts and Humanities
Karen Thornber, Professor of Comparative Literature
John Wakeley, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Gu-Yeon Wei, Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Other Faculty Offering Instruction in Expository Writing

Jerusha T. Achterberg, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Michael S. Allen, Preceptor in Expository Writing
David C. Barber, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Christina Kim Becker, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Patricia M. Bellanca, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Kevin Brian Birmingham, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Lecturer on History and Literature
Erin Leigh Blevins, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Owen Chen, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Vernon Tad Davies, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Justine Renee De Young, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Dwight Fee, Preceptor in Expository Writing, Lecturer on Sociology
Brian T. Fobi, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Janling L. Fu, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Elizabeth Greenspan, Preceptor in Expository Writing
David Hahn, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Karen L. Heath, Senior Preceptor in Expository Writing
James P. Herron, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Elissa Krakauer Jacobs, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Thomas R. Jehn, The Sosland Director of the Harvard College Writing Program
Jonah M. Johnson, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Matthew T. Levay, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Ariane Mary Liazos, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Michele C. Martinez, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Deirdre Alanna Mask, Preceptor in Expository Writing (on leave spring term)
Kelsey W. McNiff, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Lindsay Joanna Mitchell, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Yascha Benjamin Mounk, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Srilata Mukherjee, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Donna L. Mumme, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Sara A. Newland, Preceptor in Expository Writing (on leave spring term)
Tess O’Toole, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Jane A. Rosenzweig, Preceptor in Expository Writing, and Director of the Writing Center
Emily J. Shelton, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Patricia Rachael Stuelke, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Rebecca Summerhays, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Joaquin Sebastian Terrones, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Adrienne Leigh Tierney, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Jane E. Unrue, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Kenneth J. Urban, Preceptor in Expository Writing
William Conrad Weitzel, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Jeffrey Robert Wilson, Preceptor in Expository Writing
Margie Zohn, Preceptor in Expository Writing

For Undergraduates Only

Expository Writing 20 fulfills the basic requirement in Expository Writing, a requirement for all undergraduates in their first year of residence. The Expository Writing Program also offers two elective courses, Expos 10 and Expos 40. No Expository Writing courses have midterm or final examinations. For additional information on Expository Writing courses, see the Writing Program website: http://writingprogram.fas.harvard.edu.


Expository Writing 10

A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 6344 Enrollment: Limited to 10 students per section.
Members of the Department
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Note: After taking Expository Writing 10, a student must pass Expository Writing 20 to meet the College’s Expository Writing requirement.

Expository Writing 10.001. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 77429 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Patricia M. Bellanca
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.002. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 25907 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Liz Greenspan
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.003. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 92536 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Karen L. Heath
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.004. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 41014 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Thomas R. Jehn
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.005. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 56121 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.006. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 71228 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.007. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 86335 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Jane A. Rosenzweig
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.008. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 34813 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.009. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 65027 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.010. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 13505 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Rebecca Summerhays
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.011. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 80134 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Rebecca Summerhays
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.012. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 28612 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.013. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 95241 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 1.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.014. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 43719 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
William Conrad Weitzel
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.015. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 58826 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
William Conrad Weitzel
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.016. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 84655 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
James P. Herron
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.

Expository Writing 10.017. Introduction to Expository Writing
Catalog Number: 74635 Enrollment: Limited to 10.
Elizabeth Greenspan
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
A rigorous, intensive elective that helps students prepare for the demands of college writing. In small classes, students work closely with instructors on developing and organizing ideas, analyzing sources, and writing clear, engaging essays. Students also meet frequently in individual conferences with instructors to discuss their work. Assignments are based on sources from a range of disciplines and genres.



Expository Writing 20

An intensive seminar that aims to improve each student’s ability to discover and reason about evidence through the medium of essays. Each section focuses on a particular theme or topic, described on the Expos Website. All sections give students practice in formulating questions, analyzing both primary and secondary sources and properly acknowledging them, supporting arguments with strong and detailed evidence, and shaping clear, lively essays. All sections emphasize revision.

[Expository Writing 20. Expository Writing]
Catalog Number: 5518 Enrollment: Limited to 15 students per section.
Members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Students must pass one term of Expository Writing 20 to meet the College’s Expository Writing requirement.

Expository Writing 20.012. The Rise of Pop
Catalog Number: 77097 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kevin Brian Birmingham
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
The idea that there is a hierarchy separating high and low art extends as far back as Aristotle, but during the past fifty years American culture has depended upon destroying this hierarchy. This course examines what happens to art and society when the boundaries separating high and low art are gone. We will examine Thomas Pynchon, Andy Warhol, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show along with cultural theorists such as Adorno, Benjamin, Sontag, and Bakhtin.

Expository Writing 20.013. The Rise of Pop
Catalog Number: 25575 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kevin Brian Birmingham
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
The idea that there is a hierarchy separating high and low art extends as far back as Aristotle, but during the past fifty years American culture has depended upon destroying this hierarchy. This course examines what happens to art and society when the boundaries separating high and low art are gone. We will examine Thomas Pynchon, Andy Warhol, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show along with cultural theorists such as Adorno, Benjamin, Sontag, and Bakhtin.

[Expository Writing 20.018. Representations of American Democracy and Government]
Catalog Number: 70896 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Beyond the abstraction of American democracy as government of, by and for the people, what can we glean about our definitions of American governance from historical and artistic representations of it? This course will examine what US democracy looks like when brought to life in campaign commercials, in the architecture of government buildings, and in conspiracy films. We will ask how these works shape our understanding of the possibilities and constraints of democratic action.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.019. Representations of American Democracy and Government]
Catalog Number: 19374 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Beyond the abstraction of American democracy as government of, by and for the people, what can we glean about our definitions of American governance from historical and artistic representations of it? This course will examine what US democracy looks like when brought to life in campaign commercials, in the architecture of government buildings, and in conspiracy films. We will ask how these works shape our understanding of the possibilities and constraints of democratic action.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.020. Representations of American Democracy and Government
Catalog Number: 86003 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Beyond the abstraction of American democracy as government of, by and for the people, what can we glean about our definitions of American governance from historical and artistic representations of it? This course will examine what US democracy looks like when brought to life in campaign commercials, in the architecture of government buildings, and in conspiracy films. We will ask how these works shape our understanding of the possibilities and constraints of democratic action.

Expository Writing 20.021. Representations of American Democracy and Government
Catalog Number: 34481 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Vernon Tad Davies
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
Beyond the abstraction of American democracy as government of, by and for the people, what can we glean about our definitions of American governance from historical and artistic representations of it? This course will examine what US democracy looks like when brought to life in campaign commercials, in the architecture of government buildings, and in conspiracy films. We will ask how these works shape our understanding of the possibilities and constraints of democratic action.

Expository Writing 20.043. Shakespeare’s Inventions
Catalog Number: 39891 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jeffrey Robert Wilson
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
We will first examine what Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet can tell us about how individuals—in particular Shakespeare himself—actively invent and renegotiate their identities within the confines of a given culture. In the third unit we will look at Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1966) and Shakespeare in Love in order to assess the extent to which we rely on the re-invention of Shakespeare’s works for our own cultural identity.

Expository Writing 20.044. Shakespeare’s Inventions
Catalog Number: 54998 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jeffrey Robert Wilson
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
We will first examine what Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet can tell us about how individuals—in particular Shakespeare himself—actively invent and renegotiate their identities within the confines of a given culture. In the third unit we will look at Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1966) and Shakespeare in Love in order to assess the extent to which we rely on the re-invention of Shakespeare’s works for our own cultural identity.

Expository Writing 20.046. Darwinian Dating
Catalog Number: 18583 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Elissa Krakauer Jacobs
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
In this course we will examine patterns of human attraction, using an evolutionary perspective to better understand mate choice. In the first unit, we will explore the roles of biology versus culture in human behavior. Next, we will address female attraction and attempt to determine whether women prefer “nice guys” or “bad boys.” In the final unit, students will have an opportunity to undertake independent research as they explore the nature of male attraction.

Expository Writing 20.047. Darwinian Dating
Catalog Number: 85212 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Elissa Krakauer Jacobs
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
In this course we will examine patterns of human attraction, using an evolutionary perspective to better understand mate choice. In the first unit, we will explore the roles of biology versus culture in human behavior. Next, we will address female attraction and attempt to determine whether women prefer “nice guys” or “bad boys.” In the final unit, students will have an opportunity to undertake independent research as they explore the nature of male attraction.

Expository Writing 20.048. Darwinian Dating
Catalog Number: 48797 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Elissa Krakauer Jacobs
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
In this course we will examine patterns of human attraction, using an evolutionary perspective to better understand mate choice. In the first unit, we will explore the roles of biology versus culture in human behavior. Next, we will address female attraction and attempt to determine whether women prefer “nice guys” or “bad boys.” In the final unit, students will have an opportunity to undertake independent research as they explore the nature of male attraction.

Expository Writing 20.049. Darwinian Dating
Catalog Number: 63904 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Elissa Krakauer Jacobs
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
In this course we will examine patterns of human attraction, using an evolutionary perspective to better understand mate choice. In the first unit, we will explore the roles of biology versus culture in human behavior. Next, we will address female attraction and attempt to determine whether women prefer “nice guys” or “bad boys.” In the final unit, students will have an opportunity to undertake independent research as they explore the nature of male attraction.

Expository Writing 20.059. Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement
Catalog Number: 57703 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Ariane Mary Liazos
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
According to civil rights scholar Charles Payne, "Our understanding of social change, our conceptions of leadership, our understanding of the possibilities of interracial cooperation are all affected by how we remember the movement." In this seminar, we investigate the work of remembering and interpreting the mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement. We consider both popular and scholarly accounts, and we focus on the use of speeches, memoirs, and newspapers to reconstruct the events of the past.

Expository Writing 20.060. Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement
Catalog Number: 21288 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Ariane Mary Liazos
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
According to civil rights scholar Charles Payne, "Our understanding of social change, our conceptions of leadership, our understanding of the possibilities of interracial cooperation are all affected by how we remember the movement." In this seminar, we investigate the work of remembering and interpreting the mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement. We consider both popular and scholarly accounts, and we focus on the use of speeches, memoirs, and newspapers to reconstruct the events of the past.

Expository Writing 20.061. Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement
Catalog Number: 87917 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Ariane Mary Liazos
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
According to civil rights scholar Charles Payne, "Our understanding of social change, our conceptions of leadership, our understanding of the possibilities of interracial cooperation are all affected by how we remember the movement." In this seminar, we investigate the work of remembering and interpreting the mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement. We consider both popular and scholarly accounts, and we focus on the use of speeches, memoirs, and newspapers to reconstruct the events of the past.

Expository Writing 20.062. Interpreting the Civil Rights Movement
Catalog Number: 36395 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Ariane Mary Liazos
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 2.
According to civil rights scholar Charles Payne, "Our understanding of social change, our conceptions of leadership, our understanding of the possibilities of interracial cooperation are all affected by how we remember the movement." In this seminar, we investigate the work of remembering and interpreting the mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement. We consider both popular and scholarly accounts, and we focus on the use of speeches, memoirs, and newspapers to reconstruct the events of the past.

Expository Writing 20.063. Gothic Fiction
Catalog Number: 51502 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michele C. Martinez
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
This course explores the meaning and function of Gothic literature, a genre characterized by secrecy, perversion, madness, and death. In our first unit, short stories—of various centuries and nations—will allow us to develop a working definition of Gothic. In unit two we’ll interpret Jane Austen’s Gothic spoof Northanger Abbey in the context of both popular fiction and eighteenth-century debates about reading. The third unit introduces research methods that focus on the works of Edgar Allan Poe.

Expository Writing 20.064. Gothic Fiction
Catalog Number: 66609 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michele C. Martinez
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
This course explores the meaning and function of Gothic literature, a genre characterized by secrecy, perversion, madness, and death. In our first unit, short stories—of various centuries and nations—will allow us to develop a working definition of Gothic. In unit two we’ll interpret Jane Austen’s Gothic spoof Northanger Abbey in the context of both popular fiction and eighteenth-century debates about reading. The third unit introduces research methods that focus on the works of Edgar Allan Poe.

Expository Writing 20.065. Gothic Fiction
Catalog Number: 15087 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michele C. Martinez
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12.
This course explores the meaning and function of Gothic literature, a genre characterized by secrecy, perversion, madness, and death. In our first unit, short stories—of various centuries and nations—will allow us to develop a working definition of Gothic. In unit two we’ll interpret Jane Austen’s Gothic spoof Northanger Abbey in the context of both popular fiction and eighteenth-century debates about reading. The third unit introduces research methods that focus on the works of Edgar Allan Poe.

Expository Writing 20.066. Cross-Cultural Contact Zones
Catalog Number: 81716 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Srilata Mukherjee
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
How does fiction represent cross-cultural encounters between Eurocentric and non-Eurocentric worlds? In what ways do the specific social and political circumstances under which these contacts occur influence the nature of the cross-cultural encounters? Do issues of power, class, and gender function differently in cross-cultural environments for the racial groups involved than they would within a single culture? In exploring literature about three kinds of cross-cultural encounters-transient, colonial/postcolonial, and immigrant-we’ll pose such resonant questions.

Expository Writing 20.067. Cross-Cultural Contact Zones
Catalog Number: 30194 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Srilata Mukherjee
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
How does fiction represent cross-cultural encounters between Eurocentric and non-Eurocentric worlds? In what ways do the specific social and political circumstances under which these contacts occur influence the nature of the cross-cultural encounters? Do issues of power, class, and gender function differently in cross-cultural environments for the racial groups involved than they would within a single culture? In exploring literature about three kinds of cross-cultural encounters-transient, colonial/postcolonial, and immigrant-we’ll pose such resonant questions.

Expository Writing 20.068. Cross-Cultural Contact Zones
Catalog Number: 96823 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Srilata Mukherjee
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12.
How does fiction represent cross-cultural encounters between Eurocentric and non-Eurocentric worlds? In what ways do the specific social and political circumstances under which these contacts occur influence the nature of the cross-cultural encounters? Do issues of power, class, and gender function differently in cross-cultural environments for the racial groups involved than they would within a single culture? In exploring literature about three kinds of cross-cultural encounters-transient, colonial/postcolonial, and immigrant-we’ll pose such resonant questions.

Expository Writing 20.069. Cross-Cultural Contact Zones
Catalog Number: 45301 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Srilata Mukherjee
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1.
How does fiction represent cross-cultural encounters between Eurocentric and non-Eurocentric worlds? In what ways do the specific social and political circumstances under which these contacts occur influence the nature of the cross-cultural encounters? Do issues of power, class, and gender function differently in cross-cultural environments for the racial groups involved than they would within a single culture? In exploring literature about three kinds of cross-cultural encounters-transient, colonial/postcolonial, and immigrant-we’ll pose such resonant questions.

Expository Writing 20.078. Jewish Identity in American Culture
Catalog Number: 54207 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jane A. Rosenzweig
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course will examine representations of Jews in American culture and the evolution of Jewish-American culture since World War II, as well as how shifts in the cultural conversation about minorities in America have affected our understanding of Jewish identity. We will question how recent works of literature, art, film, and television challenge and reinforce Jewish stereotypes, and how they continue to shape our ideas about assimilation, the Holocaust, ethnicity, and religious practice in America.

Expository Writing 20.081. Tales of Murder
Catalog Number: 84421 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Emily J. Shelton
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
The Sixth Commandment is succinct: "Thou shalt not commit murder." And yet descriptions of murder feature prominently in Western literature and culture. Why are we so engaged by the telling of these grim tales, and what is at stake in their being told? By analyzing the challenges of shaping coherent narratives around incomprehensible acts, this course examines the ethical and aesthetic implications of mediating a phenomenon as elusive, and terrifyingly actual, as murder.

Expository Writing 20.082. Tales of Murder
Catalog Number: 32899 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Emily J. Shelton
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
The Sixth Commandment is succinct: "Thou shalt not commit murder." And yet descriptions of murder feature prominently in Western literature and culture. Why are we so engaged by the telling of these grim tales, and what is at stake in their being told? By analyzing the challenges of shaping coherent narratives around incomprehensible acts, this course examines the ethical and aesthetic implications of mediating a phenomenon as elusive, and terrifyingly actual, as murder.

[Expository Writing 20.084. Urban America]
Catalog Number: 76638 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay M. Silver Cohen
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
This course addresses questions about the past and present urban experience by analyzing American cities from various disciplinary perspectives. Unit I hones critical skills through close readings of How the Other Half Lives, an exposé of late nineteenth-century New York. Unit II emphasizes the importance of context through analysis of the play, A Raisin in the Sun with companion texts. Unit III teaches the fundamentals of research through independent projects on our local, urban environment: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Together, these units teach the mechanics of academic writing while providing insight into the problems and promise of the American city over time.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.085. Urban America]
Catalog Number: 25116 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay M. Silver Cohen
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 2.
This course addresses questions about the past and present urban experience by analyzing American cities from various disciplinary perspectives. Unit I hones critical skills through close readings of How the Other Half Lives, an exposé of late nineteenth-century New York. Unit II emphasizes the importance of context through analysis of the play, A Raisin in the Sun with companion texts. Unit III teaches the fundamentals of research through independent projects on our local, urban environment: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Together, these units teach the mechanics of academic writing while providing insight into the problems and promise of the American city over time.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.086. Urban America]
Catalog Number: 48006 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay M. Silver Cohen
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course addresses questions about the past and present urban experience by analyzing American cities from various disciplinary perspectives. Unit I hones critical skills through close readings of How the Other Half Lives, an exposé of late nineteenth-century New York. Unit II emphasizes the importance of context through analysis of the play, A Raisin in the Sun with companion texts. Unit III teaches the fundamentals of research through independent projects on our local, urban environment: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Together, these units teach the mechanics of academic writing while providing insight into the problems and promise of the American city over time.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.097. HIV/AIDS in Culture
Catalog Number: 50711 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Joaquin Sebastian Terrones
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
Perhaps more than any other event in the last quarter of the twentieth century, the AIDS crisis condensed or crystallized cultural anxieties about the body, identity, and difference. In this course, we will examine the cultural response to HIV/AIDS in North and Latin America through fiction, poetry, and visual art from the pandemic’s first fifteen years. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary; all materials will be available in English.

Expository Writing 20.098. HIV/AIDS in Culture
Catalog Number: 65818 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Joaquin Sebastian Terrones
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
Perhaps more than any other event in the last quarter of the twentieth century, the AIDS crisis condensed or crystallized cultural anxieties about the body, identity, and difference. In this course, we will examine the cultural response to HIV/AIDS in North and Latin America through fiction, poetry, and visual art from the pandemic’s first fifteen years. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary; all materials will be available in English.

Expository Writing 20.099. HIV/AIDS in Culture
Catalog Number: 14296 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Joaquin Sebastian Terrones
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
Perhaps more than any other event in the last quarter of the twentieth century, the AIDS crisis condensed or crystallized cultural anxieties about the body, identity, and difference. In this course, we will examine the cultural response to HIV/AIDS in North and Latin America through fiction, poetry, and visual art from the pandemic’s first fifteen years. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary; all materials will be available in English.

Expository Writing 20.100. HIV/AIDS in Culture
Catalog Number: 80925 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Joaquin Sebastian Terrones
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
Perhaps more than any other event in the last quarter of the twentieth century, the AIDS crisis condensed or crystallized cultural anxieties about the body, identity, and difference. In this course, we will examine the cultural response to HIV/AIDS in North and Latin America through fiction, poetry, and visual art from the pandemic’s first fifteen years. No knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is necessary; all materials will be available in English.

Expository Writing 20.101. The Voice of Authority
Catalog Number: 29403 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jane E. Unrue
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
What is authority? First, we will read the controversial One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, closely investigating that explosive novel’s complex treatment of authority. Next, we will read and meet two "at-risk" writers, comparing and analyzing effects and expressions of artistic challenges to governmental and cultural authority. Finally, our ongoing inquiry into authority will shape research topics as we investigate issues arising out of authority’s relation to education, rhetorical strategy, politics, human rights, and art.

Expository Writing 20.102. The Voice of Authority
Catalog Number: 96032 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jane E. Unrue
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
What is authority? First, we will read the controversial One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, closely investigating that explosive novel’s complex treatment of authority. Next, we will read and meet two "at-risk" writers, comparing and analyzing effects and expressions of artistic challenges to governmental and cultural authority. Finally, our ongoing inquiry into authority will shape research topics as we investigate issues arising out of authority’s relation to education, rhetorical strategy, politics, human rights, and art.

Expository Writing 20.103. The Voice of Authority
Catalog Number: 59617 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jane E. Unrue
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
What is authority? First, we will read the controversial One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, closely investigating that explosive novel’s complex treatment of authority. Next, we will read and meet two "at-risk" writers, comparing and analyzing effects and expressions of artistic challenges to governmental and cultural authority. Finally, our ongoing inquiry into authority will shape research topics as we investigate issues arising out of authority’s relation to education, rhetorical strategy, politics, human rights, and art.

Expository Writing 20.104. The Voice of Authority
Catalog Number: 74724 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jane E. Unrue
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
What is authority? First, we will read the controversial One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, closely investigating that explosive novel’s complex treatment of authority. Next, we will read and meet two "at-risk" writers, comparing and analyzing effects and expressions of artistic challenges to governmental and cultural authority. Finally, our ongoing inquiry into authority will shape research topics as we investigate issues arising out of authority’s relation to education, rhetorical strategy, politics, human rights, and art.

Expository Writing 20.105. Contemporary Theatre
Catalog Number: 23202 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kenneth J. Urban
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 2.
Since the 1960s, American and British theatre has served as a laboratory for unprecedented social and political provocation. This writing seminar analyzes plays by groundbreaking playwrights from the past five decades, and examines how these writers use the stage as a form of critical thinking that is both dramatic and world-shattering. Playwrights will include Annie Baker, Richard Maxwell, Tony Kushner, Paula Vogel, Samuel Beckett and Sarah Kane.

Expository Writing 20.106. Contemporary Theatre
Catalog Number: 89831 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kenneth J. Urban
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 3.
Since the 1960s, American and British theatre has served as a laboratory for unprecedented social and political provocation. This writing seminar analyzes plays by groundbreaking playwrights from the past five decades, and examines how these writers use the stage as a form of critical thinking that is both dramatic and world-shattering. Playwrights will include Annie Baker, Richard Maxwell, Tony Kushner, Paula Vogel, Samuel Beckett and Sarah Kane.

Expository Writing 20.113. Into the Wild
Catalog Number: 47215 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
William Conrad Weitzel
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1.
What is wilderness? Do you have to explore wilderness to care about it? Who enters the wilderness and why? We will look at expeditions into the Kalahari Desert, remote Alaska, and the central African and Amazon rainforests and examine the place of expeditionary culture in current dilemmas about global wilderness. The course will include films, websites, periodicals, and blogs, paying particular attention to such threatened biomes as the Congolese Basin and Guyana Shield as domains of conspicuous urgency.

Expository Writing 20.114. Into the Wild
Catalog Number: 62322 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
William Conrad Weitzel
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 2.
What is wilderness? Do you have to explore wilderness to care about it? Who enters the wilderness and why? We will look at expeditions into the Kalahari Desert, remote Alaska, and the central African and Amazon rainforests and examine the place of expeditionary culture in current dilemmas about global wilderness. The course will include films, websites, periodicals, and blogs, paying particular attention to such threatened biomes as the Congolese Basin and Guyana Shield as domains of conspicuous urgency.

[Expository Writing 20.123. Urban America]
Catalog Number: 72556 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay M. Silver Cohen
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course addresses questions about the past and present urban experience by analyzing American cities from various disciplinary perspectives. Unit I hones critical skills through close readings of How the Other Half Lives, an exposé of late nineteenth-century New York. Unit II emphasizes the importance of context through analysis of the play, A Raisin in the Sun with companion texts. Unit III teaches the fundamentals of research through independent projects on our local, urban environment: Cambridge, Massachusetts. Together, these units teach the mechanics of academic writing while providing insight into the problems and promise of the American city over time.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.125. Obsession
Catalog Number: 15575 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Matthew T. Levay
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 9.
This course explores the cultural representation of obsession - in film, literature, and psychoanalytic case histories - asking how artistic accounts of aberrant emotions, compulsions, and habits might intersect with or diverge from scientific accounts of obsession and its potential manifestations. Under what conditions is obsession considered a virtue, and when does it become pathological? What can a study of obsession reveal about our conceptions of normality, attachment, perfectionism, and paranoia, and their place in contemporary society?

Expository Writing 20.126. Obsession
Catalog Number: 82204 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Matthew T. Levay
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
This course explores the cultural representation of obsession - in film, literature, and psychoanalytic case histories - asking how artistic accounts of aberrant emotions, compulsions, and habits might intersect with or diverge from scientific accounts of obsession and its potential manifestations. Under what conditions is obsession considered a virtue, and when does it become pathological? What can a study of obsession reveal about our conceptions of normality, attachment, perfectionism, and paranoia, and their place in contemporary society?

Expository Writing 20.127. Obsession
Catalog Number: 30682 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Matthew T. Levay
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
This course explores the cultural representation of obsession - in film, literature, and psychoanalytic case histories - asking how artistic accounts of aberrant emotions, compulsions, and habits might intersect with or diverge from scientific accounts of obsession and its potential manifestations. Under what conditions is obsession considered a virtue, and when does it become pathological? What can a study of obsession reveal about our conceptions of normality, attachment, perfectionism, and paranoia, and their place in contemporary society?

Expository Writing 20.128. Obsession
Catalog Number: 97311 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Matthew T. Levay
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
This course explores the cultural representation of obsession - in film, literature, and psychoanalytic case histories - asking how artistic accounts of aberrant emotions, compulsions, and habits might intersect with or diverge from scientific accounts of obsession and its potential manifestations. Under what conditions is obsession considered a virtue, and when does it become pathological? What can a study of obsession reveal about our conceptions of normality, attachment, perfectionism, and paranoia, and their place in contemporary society?

Expository Writing 20.129. Contemporary Theatre
Catalog Number: 45789 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kenneth J. Urban
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 2.
Since the 1960s, American and British theatre has served as a laboratory for unprecedented social and political provocation. This writing seminar analyzes plays by groundbreaking playwrights from the past five decades, and examines how these writers use the stage as a form of critical thinking that is both dramatic and world-shattering. Playwrights will include Annie Baker, Richard Maxwell, Tony Kushner, Paula Vogel, Samuel Beckett and Sarah Kane.

Expository Writing 20.130. Contemporary Theatre
Catalog Number: 60896 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kenneth J. Urban
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 3.
Since the 1960s, American and British theatre has served as a laboratory for unprecedented social and political provocation. This writing seminar analyzes plays by groundbreaking playwrights from the past five decades, and examines how these writers use the stage as a form of critical thinking that is both dramatic and world-shattering. Playwrights will include Annie Baker, Richard Maxwell, Tony Kushner, Paula Vogel, Samuel Beckett and Sarah Kane.

Expository Writing 20.131. Philosophy of the State
Catalog Number: 31014
Owen Chen
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10.
This course inquires into the origin and political and moral nature of the state, into its forms, functions, and connections with the education and the erotic life of its citizens. Readings to be discussed and written on are taken from Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx. Throughout the course, students adjudicate between different conceptions of the state and their ends, and examine the source of power of the state.

Expository Writing 20.132. Philosophy of the State
Catalog Number: 22108 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Owen Chen
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course inquires into the origin and political and moral nature of the state, into its forms, functions, and connections with the education and the erotic life of its citizens. Readings to be discussed and written on are taken from Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx. Throughout the course, students adjudicate between different conceptions of the state and their ends, and examine the source of power of the state.

Expository Writing 20.133. Philosophy of the State
Catalog Number: 88737 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Owen Chen
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
This course inquires into the origin and political and moral nature of the state, into its forms, functions, and connections with the education and the erotic life of its citizens. Readings to be discussed and written on are taken from Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx. Throughout the course, students adjudicate between different conceptions of the state and their ends, and examine the source of power of the state.

Expository Writing 20.134. Philosophy of the State
Catalog Number: 46121 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Owen Chen
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course inquires into the origin and political and moral nature of the state, into its forms, functions, and connections with the education and the erotic life of its citizens. Readings to be discussed and written on are taken from Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx. Throughout the course, students adjudicate between different conceptions of the state and their ends, and examine the source of power of the state.

*Expository Writing 20.135. The Body in Art: From Ideal to Real
Catalog Number: 21317 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Justine Renee De Young
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10.
This course explores how artists have idealized, humanized, and celebrated the naked and nude human form over the centuries. Taking advantage of local museum collections, we will consider the tradition of the flawless classical god and goddess, how modern artists like Manet, Degas, Matisse and Picasso transgressed it, and, finally, how contemporary artists continue to radically transform the nude today. No experience with art history is necessary.

*Expository Writing 20.136. The Body in Art: From Ideal to Real
Catalog Number: 87946 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Justine Renee De Young
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course explores how artists have idealized, humanized, and celebrated the naked and nude human form over the centuries. Taking advantage of local museum collections, we will consider the tradition of the flawless classical god and goddess, how modern artists like Manet, Degas, Matisse and Picasso transgressed it, and, finally, how contemporary artists continue to radically transform the nude today. No experience with art history is necessary.

*Expository Writing 20.137. The Body in Art: From Ideal to Real
Catalog Number: 36424 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Justine Renee De Young
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
This course explores how artists have idealized, humanized, and celebrated the naked and nude human form over the centuries. Taking advantage of local museum collections, we will consider the tradition of the flawless classical god and goddess, how modern artists like Manet, Degas, Matisse and Picasso transgressed it, and, finally, how contemporary artists continue to radically transform the nude today. No experience with art history is necessary.

*Expository Writing 20.138. The Body in Art: From Ideal to Real
Catalog Number: 51531 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Justine Renee De Young
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course explores how artists have idealized, humanized, and celebrated the naked and nude human form over the centuries. Taking advantage of local museum collections, we will consider the tradition of the flawless classical god and goddess, how modern artists like Manet, Degas, Matisse and Picasso transgressed it, and, finally, how contemporary artists continue to radically transform the nude today. No experience with art history is necessary.

Expository Writing 20.140. The Experience of Class
Catalog Number: 18944 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
James P. Herron
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
This course explores the subjective experience of social class in the U.S. from an ethnographic perspective. We will examine how members of the working and professional classes define themselves and view the classes above and below them. We will focus in particular on how class position influences beliefs about work, achievement, and taste. We will also consider the role of elite educational institutions such as Harvard in shaping the class system.

Expository Writing 20.141. Portraits of Madness
Catalog Number: 68425 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Karen L. Heath
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Writers and filmmakers have long been fascinated by the artistic challenge of representing madness. What can those portraits tell us about the relationship of illness and identity, the ease of losing touch with rationality, the nature of the mind, and our own relative sanity? We will study Susanna Kaysen’s memoir Girl, Interrupted; Patrick McGrath’s gothic novel Spider and its film adaptation; and the films Donnie Darko, The Hours, and The Silence of the Lambs.

Expository Writing 20.142. Jane Austen, Then and Now
Catalog Number: 16903 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Tess O’Toole
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
This course considers Austen in her own historical context and ours, and as an author whose importance lies both inside and outside the university. In our first unit, we’ll undertake a close reading of Persuasion in order to assess Austen’s analysis of British society at a transitional moment in its history; in unit 2 we’ll consider how film and television adaptations have reinvented her best known novel, Pride and Prejudice, for a different historical moment, and in unit 3 students will engage with Austen scholarship by writing a research paper on an Austen novel or film adaption of their choice.

[Expository Writing 20.143. Jane Austen, Then and Now]
Catalog Number: 83532 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Tess O’Toole
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
This course considers Austen in her own historical context and ours, and as an author whose importance lies both inside and outside the university. In our first unit, we’ll undertake a close reading of Persuasion in order to assess Austen’s analysis of British society at a transitional moment in its history; in unit 2 we’ll consider how film and television adaptations have reinvented her best known novel, Pride and Prejudice, for a different historical moment, and in unit 3 students will engage with Austen scholarship by writing a research paper on an Austen novel or film adaption of their choice.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.144. Jane Austen, Then and Now
Catalog Number: 98639 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Tess O’Toole
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
This course considers Austen in her own historical context and ours, and as an author whose importance lies both inside and outside the university. In our first unit, we’ll undertake a close reading of Persuasion in order to assess Austen’s analysis of British society at a transitional moment in its history; in unit 2 we’ll consider how film and television adaptations have reinvented her best known novel, Pride and Prejudice, for a different historical moment, and in unit 3 students will engage with Austen scholarship by writing a research paper on an Austen novel or film adaption of their choice.

[Expository Writing 20.145. Jane Austen, Then and Now]
Catalog Number: 47117 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Tess O’Toole
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course considers Austen in her own historical context and ours, and as an author whose importance lies both inside and outside the university. In our first unit, we’ll undertake a close reading of Persuasion in order to assess Austen’s analysis of British society at a transitional moment in its history; in unit 2 we’ll consider how film and television adaptations have reinvented her best known novel, Pride and Prejudice, for a different historical moment, and in unit 3 students will engage with Austen scholarship by writing a research paper on an Austen novel or film adaption of their choice.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.154. Resistance]
Catalog Number: 19608 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
What constitutes an act of resistance? What role do individual beliefs, collective action, art and literature have in protest movements? What can the study of dissent teach us about the past and about the world we live in today? This course will explore these questions through case studies drawn from contemporary politics and culture, the apartheid era in South Africa, and Harvard history.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.155. Resistance]
Catalog Number: 86237 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
What constitutes an act of resistance? What role do individual beliefs, collective action, art and literature have in protest movements? What can the study of dissent teach us about the past and about the world we live in today? This course will explore these questions through case studies drawn from contemporary politics and culture, the apartheid era in South Africa, and Harvard history.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.156. Resistance
Catalog Number: 34715 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
What constitutes an act of resistance? What role do individual beliefs, collective action, art and literature have in protest movements? What can the study of dissent teach us about the past and about the world we live in today? This course will explore these questions through case studies drawn from contemporary politics and culture, the apartheid era in South Africa, and Harvard history.

Expository Writing 20.157. Resistance
Catalog Number: 49822 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Kelsey W. McNiff
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
What constitutes an act of resistance? What role do individual beliefs, collective action, art and literature have in protest movements? What can the study of dissent teach us about the past and about the world we live in today? This course will explore these questions through case studies drawn from contemporary politics and culture, the apartheid era in South Africa, and Harvard history.

Expository Writing 20.162. Gothic Fiction
Catalog Number: 26805 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Patricia M. Bellanca
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
This course explores the meaning and function of Gothic literature, a genre characterized by secrecy, perversion, madness, and death. In our first unit, short stories-of various centuries and nations-will allow us to develop a working definition of Gothic. In unit two we’ll interpret Jane Austen’s Gothic spoof Northanger Abbey in the context of both popular fiction and eighteenth-century debates about reading. The third unit introduces research methods that focus on the works of Edgar Allan Poe.

Expository Writing 20.163. Cities and Globalization
Catalog Number: 65925 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Elizabeth Greenspan
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
This course investigates how "the global city" brings to the fore the opportunities and challenges of contemporary globalization. How do economic and cultural forms link cities like New York, Paris, and Mumbai? How is urban protest a response to globalization? We will answer these questions by reading a variety of texts - including theoretical works by Saskia Sassen and Ulf Hannerz, and literary non-fiction by Suketu Mehta - and viewing artistic interpretations, including the film "La Haine."

Expository Writing 20.164. Tragedy and Everyday Life
Catalog Number: 14403 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12.
In this course we will examine tragedies both ancient and modern, focusing on problems such as self-knowledge, certainty, intra- and interpersonal conflict, and loneliness. We will explore tragedy both as a form and as a collection of themes, and we will compare the idiosyncratic ways in which terms such as "tragedy" and "tragic" have developed within academic as well as mainstream contexts. Readings and screenings will include works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Bergman, and Hitchcock.

Expository Writing 20.165. Tragedy and Everyday Life
Catalog Number: 81032 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1.
In this course we will examine tragedies both ancient and modern, focusing on problems such as self-knowledge, certainty, intra- and interpersonal conflict, and loneliness. We will explore tragedy both as a form and as a collection of themes, and we will compare the idiosyncratic ways in which terms such as "tragedy" and "tragic" have developed within academic as well as mainstream contexts. Readings and screenings will include works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Bergman, and Hitchcock.

[Expository Writing 20.167. Social Worlds of Friendship]
Catalog Number: 38416 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Dwight Fee
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
Most of us appreciate the importance of friendship, but do we really understand how friendships are formed and how they shape our lives? Do friendships hold a larger potential for social transformation? This course explores the meaning and significance of friendship, particularly in terms of personal identity, community building, and social change. We will explore classical ideas about friendship and delve into contemporary issues such as friendship and difference, changes in personal communities, and the challenge that friendship poses to traditional relational forms.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.168. Social Worlds of Friendship]
Catalog Number: 53523 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Dwight Fee
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Most of us appreciate the importance of friendship, but do we really understand how friendships are formed and how they shape our lives? Do friendships hold a larger potential for social transformation? This course explores the meaning and significance of friendship, particularly in terms of personal identity, community building, and social change. We will explore classical ideas about friendship and delve into contemporary issues such as friendship and difference, changes in personal communities, and the challenge that friendship poses to traditional relational forms.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.169. Imagining Animals
Catalog Number: 17108 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David Hahn
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
What might the world look like to an animal? To what extent can we as humans even imagine such a perspective? First, we will develop a working understanding of the problem of imagining animals; in Unit II, we will test certain philosophical claims against scientific accounts. In Unit III, we will more directly confront the practical question of how to live with animals, evaluating arguments from ethics and interspecies theory. Readings include: Nagel’s What Is It Like to Be a Bat?; Horowitz’s Inside of a Dog; Grandin’s Animals in Translation; and David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster.

Expository Writing 20.170. Imagining Animals
Catalog Number: 83737 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David Hahn
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12.
What might the world look like to an animal? To what extent can we as humans even imagine such a perspective? First, we will develop a working understanding of the problem of imagining animals; in Unit II, we will test certain philosophical claims against scientific accounts. In Unit III, we will more directly confront the practical question of how to live with animals, evaluating arguments from ethics and interspecies theory. Readings include: Nagel’s What Is It Like to Be a Bat?; Horowitz’s Inside of a Dog; Grandin’s Animals in Translation; and David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster.

Expository Writing 20.173. On Risk and Reason
Catalog Number: 47322 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Adrienne Tierney
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Scientific findings about human health and behavior are often described in terms of risk. However, reasoning about risk turns out to be a complex task. In this course, we will explore why messages about risk, particularly those associated with risk to health and well-being, are challenging to understand. We will focus on what cognitive capacities are involved in thinking about and making decisions based on scientific information presented in terms of risk.

Expository Writing 20.174. Reading the Body
Catalog Number: 43826 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Rebecca Summerhays
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
What does it mean-and what has it meant-to have a body? How does the way we think about our bodies depend upon the technologies we use to manage and measure them and the artistic forms we use to represent them? We will explore Harvard’s collection of medical curiosities and instruments, analyze how Lamarck, Paley, Darwin, and Byatt theorize the human body, and explore contemporary representations of the body in many contexts, from films to athletics.

Expository Writing 20.175. Reading the Body
Catalog Number: 58933 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Rebecca Summerhays
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
What does it mean-and what has it meant-to have a body? How does the way we think about our bodies depend upon the technologies we use to manage and measure them and the artistic forms we use to represent them? We will explore Harvard’s collection of medical curiosities and instruments, analyze how Lamarck, Paley, Darwin, and Byatt theorize the human body, and explore contemporary representations of the body in many contexts, from films to athletics.

Expository Writing 20.176. Social Worlds of Friendship
Catalog Number: 42619 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Dwight Fee
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Most of us appreciate the importance of friendship, but do we really understand how friendships are formed and how they shape our lives? Do friendships hold a larger potential for social transformation? This course explores the meaning and significance of friendship, particularly in terms of personal identity, community building, and social change. We will explore classical ideas about friendship and delve into contemporary issues such as friendship and difference, changes in personal communities, and the challenge that friendship poses to traditional relational forms.

Expository Writing 20.177. Social Worlds of Friendship
Catalog Number: 73332 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Dwight Fee
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Most of us appreciate the importance of friendship, but do we really understand how friendships are formed and how they shape our lives? Do friendships hold a larger potential for social transformation? This course explores the meaning and significance of friendship, particularly in terms of personal identity, community building, and social change. We will explore classical ideas about friendship and delve into contemporary issues such as friendship and difference, changes in personal communities, and the challenge that friendship poses to traditional relational forms.

Expository Writing 20.178. Imagining Animals
Catalog Number: 23463 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David Hahn
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
What might the world look like to an animal? To what extent can we as humans even imagine such a perspective? First, we will develop a working understanding of the problem of imagining animals; in Unit II, we will test certain philosophical claims against scientific accounts. In Unit III, we will more directly confront the practical question of how to live with animals, evaluating arguments from ethics and interspecies theory. Readings include: Nagel’s What Is It Like to Be a Bat?; Horowitz’s Inside of a Dog; Grandin’s Animals in Translation; and David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster.

Expository Writing 20.179. Imagining Animals
Catalog Number: 16549 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David Hahn
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
What might the world look like to an animal? To what extent can we as humans even imagine such a perspective? First, we will develop a working understanding of the problem of imagining animals; in Unit II, we will test certain philosophical claims against scientific accounts. In Unit III, we will more directly confront the practical question of how to live with animals, evaluating arguments from ethics and interspecies theory. Readings include: Nagel’s What Is It Like to Be a Bat?; Horowitz’s Inside of a Dog; Grandin’s Animals in Translation; and David Foster Wallace’s Consider the Lobster.

Expository Writing 20.184. On Risk and Reason
Catalog Number: 86869 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Adrienne Tierney
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Scientific findings about human health and behavior are often described in terms of risk. However, reasoning about risk turns out to be a complex task. In this course, we will explore why messages about risk, particularly those associated with risk to health and well-being, are challenging to understand. We will focus on what cognitive capacities are involved in thinking about and making decisions based on scientific information presented in terms of risk.

Expository Writing 20.185. On Risk and Reason
Catalog Number: 82633 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Adrienne Tierney
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 1.
Scientific findings about human health and behavior are often described in terms of risk. However, reasoning about risk turns out to be a complex task. In this course, we will explore why messages about risk, particularly those associated with risk to health and well-being, are challenging to understand. We will focus on what cognitive capacities are involved in thinking about and making decisions based on scientific information presented in terms of risk.

Expository Writing 20.186. Indian Philosophy and the Search for the Self
Catalog Number: 15057 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michael S. Allen
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
Who are you? What does it mean to have a self, and how do we even know we have one? This course explores the views of thinkers who radically challenge our everyday notions of self: Buddhist philosophers who denied the very existence of the self, and Hindu philosophers who taught that most of us are ignorant of our true selves. We will read early scriptural classics, later philosophical literature, and works on yoga and meditation, concluding with a look at the transformation of these practices in contemporary American culture.

Expository Writing 20.187. Indian Philosophy and the Search for the Self
Catalog Number: 94674 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michael S. Allen
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
Who are you? What does it mean to have a self, and how do we even know we have one? This course explores the views of thinkers who radically challenge our everyday notions of self: Buddhist philosophers who denied the very existence of the self, and Hindu philosophers who taught that most of us are ignorant of our true selves. We will read early scriptural classics, later philosophical literature, and works on yoga and meditation, concluding with a look at the transformation of these practices in contemporary American culture.

Expository Writing 20.188. Indian Philosophy and the Search for the Self
Catalog Number: 22383 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Michael S. Allen
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
Who are you? What does it mean to have a self, and how do we even know we have one? This course explores the views of thinkers who radically challenge our everyday notions of self: Buddhist philosophers who denied the very existence of the self, and Hindu philosophers who taught that most of us are ignorant of our true selves. We will read early scriptural classics, later philosophical literature, and works on yoga and meditation, concluding with a look at the transformation of these practices in contemporary American culture.

Expository Writing 20.189. Indian Philosophy and the Search for the Self
Catalog Number: 99002
Michael S. Allen
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
Who are you? What does it mean to have a self, and how do we even know we have one? This course explores the views of thinkers who radically challenge our everyday notions of self: Buddhist philosophers who denied the very existence of the self, and Hindu philosophers who taught that most of us are ignorant of our true selves. We will read early scriptural classics, later philosophical literature, and works on yoga and meditation, concluding with a look at the transformation of these practices in contemporary American culture.

Expository Writing 20.190. The Rise of China
Catalog Number: 51015 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Sara A. Newland
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
If the 20th century was the "American Century," will the 21st be the "Chinese Century"? As the locus of global economic growth shifts to Asia, what cultural and political changes will accompany this transformation? Does China’s rise represent a threat, a competing set of values, an opportunity, or some combination of the three? In this course, we will examine the causes and consequences of China’s ascendance as a global power. Relying on sources ranging from oral histories to Wikileaks cables, we will analyze how China is changing and how people across the globe understand China’s relevance to their own lives.

Expository Writing 20.191. The Rise of China
Catalog Number: 92256 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Sara A. Newland
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1.
If the 20th century was the "American Century," will the 21st be the "Chinese Century"? As the locus of global economic growth shifts to Asia, what cultural and political changes will accompany this transformation? Does China’s rise represent a threat, a competing set of values, an opportunity, or some combination of the three? In this course, we will examine the causes and consequences of China’s ascendance as a global power. Relying on sources ranging from oral histories to Wikileaks cables, we will analyze how China is changing and how people across the globe understand China’s relevance to their own lives.

[Expository Writing 20.192. The Rise of China]
Catalog Number: 93478 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Sara A. Newland
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
If the 20th century was the "American Century," will the 21st be the "Chinese Century"? As the locus of global economic growth shifts to Asia, what cultural and political changes will accompany this transformation? Does China’s rise represent a threat, a competing set of values, an opportunity, or some combination of the three? In this course, we will examine the causes and consequences of China’s ascendance as a global power. Relying on sources ranging from oral histories to Wikileaks cables, we will analyze how China is changing and how people across the globe understand China’s relevance to their own lives.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.193. The Rise of China]
Catalog Number: 77031 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Sara A. Newland
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
If the 20th century was the "American Century," will the 21st be the "Chinese Century"? As the locus of global economic growth shifts to Asia, what cultural and political changes will accompany this transformation? Does China’s rise represent a threat, a competing set of values, an opportunity, or some combination of the three? In this course, we will examine the causes and consequences of China’s ascendance as a global power. Relying on sources ranging from oral histories to Wikileaks cables, we will analyze how China is changing and how people across the globe understand China’s relevance to their own lives.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.194. Dangerous Speech
Catalog Number: 24282 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Deirdre Alanna Mask
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
"Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech." The First Amendment has, with this short statement, made America exceptional in its protection of free expression. Yet our commitment to the freedom of speech has real limits. In this course, we’ll examine the extent to which the First Amendment protects "dangerous speech"-a category that includes incitements to violence, hate speech, and the communication of "subversive" ideas. Through analysis of Supreme Court decisions, First Amendment theorists and contextual materials, we’ll probe the boundaries of, in Justice Holmes’s words, "the freedom for the thought that we hate."

Expository Writing 20.195. Dangerous Speech
Catalog Number: 20143 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Deirdre Alanna Mask
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
"Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech." The First Amendment has, with this short statement, made America exceptional in its protection of free expression. Yet our commitment to the freedom of speech has real limits. In this course, we’ll examine the extent to which the First Amendment protects "dangerous speech"-a category that includes incitements to violence, hate speech, and the communication of "subversive" ideas. Through analysis of Supreme Court decisions, First Amendment theorists and contextual materials, we’ll probe the boundaries of, in Justice Holmes’s words, "the freedom for the thought that we hate."

[Expository Writing 20.196. Dangerous Speech]
Catalog Number: 39724 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Deirdre Alanna Mask
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
"Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech." The First Amendment has, with this short statement, made America exceptional in its protection of free expression. Yet our commitment to the freedom of speech has real limits. In this course, we’ll examine the extent to which the First Amendment protects "dangerous speech"-a category that includes incitements to violence, hate speech, and the communication of "subversive" ideas. Through analysis of Supreme Court decisions, First Amendment theorists and contextual materials, we’ll probe the boundaries of, in Justice Holmes’s words, "the freedom for the thought that we hate."
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.197. Dangerous Speech]
Catalog Number: 70696 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Deirdre Alanna Mask
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
"Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech." The First Amendment has, with this short statement, made America exceptional in its protection of free expression. Yet our commitment to the freedom of speech has real limits. In this course, we’ll examine the extent to which the First Amendment protects "dangerous speech"-a category that includes incitements to violence, hate speech, and the communication of "subversive" ideas. Through analysis of Supreme Court decisions, First Amendment theorists and contextual materials, we’ll probe the boundaries of, in Justice Holmes’s words, "the freedom for the thought that we hate."
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.202. Evolutionary Leaps
Catalog Number: 30397 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Erin Leigh Blevins
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10.
Evolution occurs in infinitesimal steps, but in hindsight certain evolutionary “moments” stand out as great leaps. Fish ventured onto land. Birds took flight. An ape-like ancestor became...us. In this course, we’ll investigate these three pivotal moments through hands-on encounters with fossils. You’ll meet a 300-million-year-old fossil fish, and learn why Harvard scientists scoured the Arctic to find it. You’ll hold one of the world’s oldest feathers and discuss what it reveals about how flight began. And through independent research, you’ll tackle a question discussed since Darwin’s time: what makes us special? What would you claim is the human evolutionary leap?

Expository Writing 20.203. Evolutionary Leaps
Catalog Number: 62818 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Erin Leigh Blevins
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Evolution occurs in infinitesimal steps, but in hindsight certain evolutionary “moments” stand out as great leaps. Fish ventured onto land. Birds took flight. An ape-like ancestor became...us. In this course, we’ll investigate these three pivotal moments through hands-on encounters with fossils. You’ll meet a 300-million-year-old fossil fish, and learn why Harvard scientists scoured the Arctic to find it. You’ll hold one of the world’s oldest feathers and discuss what it reveals about how flight began. And through independent research, you’ll tackle a question discussed since Darwin’s time: what makes us special? What would you claim is the human evolutionary leap?

Expository Writing 20.204. Evolutionary Leaps
Catalog Number: 42426 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Erin Leigh Blevins
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Evolution occurs in infinitesimal steps, but in hindsight certain evolutionary “moments” stand out as great leaps. Fish ventured onto land. Birds took flight. An ape-like ancestor became...us. In this course, we’ll investigate these three pivotal moments through hands-on encounters with fossils. You’ll meet a 300-million-year-old fossil fish, and learn why Harvard scientists scoured the Arctic to find it. You’ll hold one of the world’s oldest feathers and discuss what it reveals about how flight began. And through independent research, you’ll tackle a question discussed since Darwin’s time: what makes us special? What would you claim is the human evolutionary leap?

Expository Writing 20.205. Evolutionary Leaps
Catalog Number: 87375 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Erin Leigh Blevins
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Evolution occurs in infinitesimal steps, but in hindsight certain evolutionary “moments” stand out as great leaps. Fish ventured onto land. Birds took flight. An ape-like ancestor became...us. In this course, we’ll investigate these three pivotal moments through hands-on encounters with fossils. You’ll meet a 300-million-year-old fossil fish, and learn why Harvard scientists scoured the Arctic to find it. You’ll hold one of the world’s oldest feathers and discuss what it reveals about how flight began. And through independent research, you’ll tackle a question discussed since Darwin’s time: what makes us special? What would you claim is the human evolutionary leap?

[Expository Writing 20.210. Tragedy and Everyday Life]
Catalog Number: 26509 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 12.
In this course we will examine tragedies both ancient and modern, focusing on problems such as self-knowledge, certainty, intra- and interpersonal conflict, and loneliness. We will explore tragedy both as a form and as a collection of themes, and we will compare the idiosyncratic ways in which terms such as "tragedy" and "tragic" have developed within academic as well as mainstream contexts. Readings and screenings will include works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Bergman, and Hitchcock.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[Expository Writing 20.211. Tragedy and Everyday Life]
Catalog Number: 65696 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jonah M. Johnson
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
In this course we will examine tragedies both ancient and modern, focusing on problems such as self-knowledge, certainty, intra- and interpersonal conflict, and loneliness. We will explore tragedy both as a form and as a collection of themes, and we will compare the idiosyncratic ways in which terms such as "tragedy" and "tragic" have developed within academic as well as mainstream contexts. Readings and screenings will include works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Bergman, and Hitchcock.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

Expository Writing 20.216. On Risk and Reason
Catalog Number: 47496
Adrienne Leigh Tierney
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
Scientific findings about human health and behavior are often described in terms of risk. However, reasoning about risk turns out to be a complex task. In this course, we will explore why messages about risk, particularly those associated with risk to health and well-being, are challenging to understand. We will focus on what cognitive capacities are involved in thinking about and making decisions based on scientific information presented in terms of risk.

Expository Writing 20.217. Food - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 24695 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Donna L. Mumme
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
What should we eat? What do we eat? Why do we eat it? These questions and the psychology behind what we eat are the focus of this course. First, we will examine the debate between "sustainable" and "industrialized" farming as we consider what drives our food choices. Next we will use psychology research on eating, decision-making, and behavior change to evaluate the soundness of a recent food-related policy decision aimed at addressing obesity. Finally, we will take what we have learned about why we eat what we eat and research other influences to investigate our own food choices.

Expository Writing 20.218. Food - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 64615 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Donna L. Mumme
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
What should we eat? What do we eat? Why do we eat it? These questions and the psychology behind what we eat are the focus of this course. First, we will examine the debate between "sustainable" and "industrialized" farming as we consider what drives our food choices. Next we will use psychology research on eating, decision-making, and behavior change to evaluate the soundness of a recent food-related policy decision aimed at addressing obesity. Finally, we will take what we have learned about why we eat what we eat and research other influences to investigate our own food choices.

Expository Writing 20.219. Food
Catalog Number: 26584 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Donna L. Mumme
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
What should we eat? What do we eat? Why do we eat it? These questions and the psychology behind what we eat are the focus of this course. First, we will examine the debate between "sustainable" and "industrialized" farming as we consider what drives our food choices. Next we will use psychology research on eating, decision-making, and behavior change to evaluate the soundness of a recent food-related policy decision aimed at addressing obesity. Finally, we will take what we have learned about why we eat what we eat and research other influences to investigate our own food choices.

Expository Writing 20.220. Food
Catalog Number: 20779
Donna L. Mumme
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
What should we eat? What do we eat? Why do we eat it? These questions and the psychology behind what we eat are the focus of this course. First, we will examine the debate between "sustainable" and "industrialized" farming as we consider what drives our food choices. Next we will use psychology research on eating, decision-making, and behavior change to evaluate the soundness of a recent food-related policy decision aimed at addressing obesity. Finally, we will take what we have learned about why we eat what we eat and research other influences to investigate our own food choices.

Expository Writing 20.221. Slave Narratives
Catalog Number: 61846 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Peter Becker
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
Written in the United States from the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, slave narratives represented the story from slavery to freedom, the escape from the South to the North, and the intellectual journey towards literacy and public speaking. This course examines some famous representatives of the genre and the complex questions it provoked as well as post-Civil Rights modifications of such narratives. We will focus on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), William and Ellen Craft’s Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860), Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012).

Expository Writing 20.224. Sports and the Law
Catalog Number: 54029 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Brian T. Fobi
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
The world of sports is one of the most dynamic and complete microcosms of American life. Since the advent of big-money professional and "amateur" athletics at the dawn of the 20th century, sports has had to confront a range of important issues revolving around fairness: race, gender, labor versus ownership, drugs, money, violence, and economic freedom. We will address these issues through court cases, articles, and documentary films. Using these sources, students will craft essays that present powerful arguments about the role and place of sports within American life.

Expository Writing 20.225. Sports and the Law
Catalog Number: 16753 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Brian T. Fobi
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
The world of sports is one of the most dynamic and complete microcosms of American life. Since the advent of big-money professional and "amateur" athletics at the dawn of the 20th century, sports has had to confront a range of important issues revolving around fairness: race, gender, labor versus ownership, drugs, money, violence, and economic freedom. We will address these issues through court cases, articles, and documentary films. Using these sources, students will craft essays that present powerful arguments about the role and place of sports within American life.

Expository Writing 20.226. Who Owns the Past?
Catalog Number: 54641 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Janling L. Fu
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Expository Writing 20.228. Is Poetry Necessary? - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 62754 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David C. Barber
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 1.
Poetry has traditionally exemplified the greatest height of artistic expression, but it is also the art with the longest history of having its authority and integrity called into question. This course examines emblematic works in prose and verse that grapple with perennial disputes over the significance of poetry. We’ll consider both modern and classical conceptions of poetry’s purpose and value as we question why so many poets have found it necessary to defend and justify their art.

Expository Writing 20.229. Slave Narratives - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 44768 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Peter Becker
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
Written in the United States from the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, slave narratives represented the story from slavery to freedom, the escape from the South to the North, and the intellectual journey towards literacy and public speaking. This course examines some famous representatives of the genre and the complex questions it provoked as well as post-Civil Rights modifications of such narratives. We will focus on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), William and Ellen Craft’s Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860), Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012).

Expository Writing 20.230. Slave Narratives - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 22728 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Peter Becker
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
Written in the United States from the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, slave narratives represented the story from slavery to freedom, the escape from the South to the North, and the intellectual journey towards literacy and public speaking. This course examines some famous representatives of the genre and the complex questions it provoked as well as post-Civil Rights modifications of such narratives. We will focus on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), William and Ellen Craft’s Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860), Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012).

Expository Writing 20.231. Sports and the Law - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 78227 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Brian T. Fobi
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12.
The world of sports is one of the most dynamic and complete microcosms of American life. Since the advent of big-money professional and "amateur" athletics at the dawn of the 20th century, sports has had to confront a range of important issues revolving around fairness: race, gender, labor versus ownership, drugs, money, violence, and economic freedom. We will address these issues through court cases, articles, and documentary films. Using these sources, students will craft essays that present powerful arguments about the role and place of sports within American life.

Expository Writing 20.232. Sports and the Law - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 98883 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Brian T. Fobi
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 1.
The world of sports is one of the most dynamic and complete microcosms of American life. Since the advent of big-money professional and "amateur" athletics at the dawn of the 20th century, sports has had to confront a range of important issues revolving around fairness: race, gender, labor versus ownership, drugs, money, violence, and economic freedom. We will address these issues through court cases, articles, and documentary films. Using these sources, students will craft essays that present powerful arguments about the role and place of sports within American life.

Expository Writing 20.233. Who Owns the Past? - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 64885 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Janling L. Fu
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Expository Writing 20.234. Who Owns the Past? - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 62896 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Janling L. Fu
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 2.
What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Expository Writing 20.235. Slave Narratives - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 67053 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Peter Becker
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
Written in the United States from the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, slave narratives represented the story from slavery to freedom, the escape from the South to the North, and the intellectual journey towards literacy and public speaking. This course examines some famous representatives of the genre and the complex questions it provoked as well as post-Civil Rights modifications of such narratives. We will focus on the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), William and Ellen Craft’s Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860), Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012).

Expository Writing 20.236. Who Owns the Past? - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 24829 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Janling L. Fu
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 2.
What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Expository Writing 20.237. Woolf and Hemingway - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 41035 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Christina Kim Becker
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10.
Ernest Hemingway and Virginia Woolf-few authors have been as celebrated and as influential as these two great literary stylists. Yet it is hard to imagine two authors who differ more in their literary outlook and style. In this course, we will read Woolf and Hemingway side by side. We will investigate how their gendered views on life and art create iconic texts of the twentieth century. Primary sources will include short stories by Hemingway, critical essays and short fiction by Woolf, Hemingway’s novel A Farewell to Arms, and Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway.

Expository Writing 20.238. Woolf and Hemingway - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 38892 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Christina Kim Becker
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Ernest Hemingway and Virginia Woolf-few authors have been as celebrated and as influential as these two great literary stylists. Yet it is hard to imagine two authors who differ more in their literary outlook and style. In this course, we will read Woolf and Hemingway side by side. We will investigate how their gendered views on life and art create iconic texts of the twentieth century. Primary sources will include short stories by Hemingway, critical essays and short fiction by Woolf, Hemingway’s novel A Farewell to Arms, and Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway.

Expository Writing 20.239. Woolf and Hemingway - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 91768 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Christina Kim Becker
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.
Ernest Hemingway and Virginia Woolf-few authors have been as celebrated and as influential as these two great literary stylists. Yet it is hard to imagine two authors who differ more in their literary outlook and style. In this course, we will read Woolf and Hemingway side by side. We will investigate how their gendered views on life and art create iconic texts of the twentieth century. Primary sources will include short stories by Hemingway, critical essays and short fiction by Woolf, Hemingway’s novel A Farewell to Arms, and Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway.

Expository Writing 20.240. Woolf and Hemingway - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 92364 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Christina Kim Becker
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Ernest Hemingway and Virginia Woolf-few authors have been as celebrated and as influential as these two great literary stylists. Yet it is hard to imagine two authors who differ more in their literary outlook and style. In this course, we will read Woolf and Hemingway side by side. We will investigate how their gendered views on life and art create iconic texts of the twentieth century. Primary sources will include short stories by Hemingway, critical essays and short fiction by Woolf, Hemingway’s novel A Farewell to Arms, and Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway.

Expository Writing 20.241. Paradox in Public Health - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 20808 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jerusha T. Achterberg
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10.
What are the goals of public health interventions? What should they be? If public health as practiced today is often concerned with empowering individuals to make their own health choices, then what happens when the health interests of the population conflict with the interests and rights of the individual? In this class, we will use scientific articles and other academic sources to consider potential paradoxes of public health, both historical and contemporary.

Expository Writing 20.242. Paradox in Public Health - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 83462 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jerusha T. Achterberg
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 11.
What are the goals of public health interventions? What should they be? If public health as practiced today is often concerned with empowering individuals to make their own health choices, then what happens when the health interests of the population conflict with the interests and rights of the individual? In this class, we will use scientific articles and other academic sources to consider potential paradoxes of public health, both historical and contemporary.

Expository Writing 20.243. Paradox in Public Health - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 37993 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jerusha T. Achterberg
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10.
What are the goals of public health interventions? What should they be? If public health as practiced today is often concerned with empowering individuals to make their own health choices, then what happens when the health interests of the population conflict with the interests and rights of the individual? In this class, we will use scientific articles and other academic sources to consider potential paradoxes of public health, both historical and contemporary.

Expository Writing 20.244. Paradox in Public Health - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 89896 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jerusha T. Achterberg
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
What are the goals of public health interventions? What should they be? If public health as practiced today is often concerned with empowering individuals to make their own health choices, then what happens when the health interests of the population conflict with the interests and rights of the individual? In this class, we will use scientific articles and other academic sources to consider potential paradoxes of public health, both historical and contemporary.

Expository Writing 20.245. Democracy in the Digital Age - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 31391 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Yascha Benjamin Mounk
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
Information technology has transformed politics with breathtaking speed. But have these changes been as important, and as positive, as is widely claimed? In this course, we assess technology’s alleged role in destabilizing autocratic regimes, look at technology’s impact on American politics, and assess whether we should reform our political institutions to make greater use of new technologies. We consult studies by social scientists, read the Twitter feed of the Syrian opposition, watch a documentary about the protestors in Tahrir Square, analyze the rise of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street, study a short story by Isaac Asimov, and debate "The Dictator’s Practical Internet Guide to Power Retention."

Expository Writing 20.246. Democracy in the Digital Age - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 92306 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Yascha Benjamin Mounk
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12.
Information technology has transformed politics with breathtaking speed. But have these changes been as important, and as positive, as is widely claimed? In this course, we assess technology’s alleged role in destabilizing autocratic regimes, look at technology’s impact on American politics, and assess whether we should reform our political institutions to make greater use of new technologies. We consult studies by social scientists, read the Twitter feed of the Syrian opposition, watch a documentary about the protestors in Tahrir Square, analyze the rise of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street, study a short story by Isaac Asimov, and debate "The Dictator’s Practical Internet Guide to Power Retention."

Expository Writing 20.247. American Criminals - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 34777 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay Joanna Mitchell
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 2.

Expository Writing 20.248. American Family Fictions - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 71174 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Patricia Stuelke
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10.

*Expository Writing 20.249. American Criminals - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 36066 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Lindsay Joanna Mitchell
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.

*Expository Writing 20.250. Wizards and Wild Things - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 28327 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David C. Barber
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 1.
This course will consider the origin and evolution of children’s literature by examining pivotal works from the Puritan era to the present. We’ll also draw on critical perspectives as we consider evolving ideas of childhood, persistent disputes about what children should read, and the essential function of imaginative literature for children. In the final unit, students will conduct research to place a major children’s author of their choice in a relevant cultural and historical context.



*Expository Writing 40. Public Speaking Practicum
Catalog Number: 9155 Enrollment: Limited to 30.
Margie Zohn
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). M., W., 3–5.
This course develops and strengthens the skills necessary for successful public speaking. Students learn strategies for impromptu speaking, preparing and delivering presentations, formulating and organizing persuasive arguments, cultivating critical thinking, engaging with an audience, using the voice and body, and building confidence in oral expression. Besides refining their skills, students receive training as public speaking tutors in preparation for serving as peer tutors for the Derek Bok Center’s Program in Speaking and Learning.
Note: See the Writing Program for admission information. Required Introductory Meeting, Monday, January 27, 2014, 3 pm - 5 pm. See course iSite for further details.