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Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Faculty of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

John Wakeley, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (Chair)
Arkhat Abzhanov, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Andrew J. Berry, Lecturer on Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Andrew A. Biewener, Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology (on leave fall term)
Kirsten Bomblies, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Michael R. Canfield, Lecturer on Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Jennifer A. Carr, Preceptor in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Colleen M. Cavanaugh, Edward C. Jeffrey Professor of Biology
Stacey A. Combes, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Charles C. Davis, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Curator of Vascular Plants in the Harvard University Herbaria
Benjamin Lovegren de Bivort, Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Michael Manish Desai, Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and of Physics
Scott V. Edwards, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, and Curator of Ornithology
Cassandra G. Extavour, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Brian D. Farrell, Professor of Biology
David R. Foster, Senior Lecturer on Biology
William Friedman, Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Peter R. Girguis, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Gonzalo Giribet, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Curator of Invertebrates in the Museum of Comparative Zoology (Director of Undergraduate Studies)
David A. Haig, George Putnam Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
James Hanken, Professor of Biology and Curator of Herpetology, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology (on leave fall term)
Daniel L. Hartl, Higgins Professor of Biology (FAS) and Professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases (Public Health)
Rosanne Healy, Lecturer on Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Hopi E. Hoekstra, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard College Professor, and Curator of Mammals in the Museum of Comparative Zoology
N. Michele Holbrook, Charles Bullard Professor of Forestry
Robin Hopkins, Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Collin H. Johnson, Preceptor in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Andrew H. Knoll, Fisher Professor of Natural History and Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Elena M. Kramer, Bussey Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (Director of Graduate Studies)
George V. Lauder, Henry Bryant Bigelow Professor of Ichthyology and Curator of Ichthyology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology
Jonathan Losos, Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin America and Curator in Herpetology (on leave 2014-15)
L. Mahadevan, Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and of Physics (on leave 2014-15)
James Mallet, Distinguished Lecturer on Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
James J. McCarthy, Professor of Biological Oceanography and Alexander Agassiz Professor of Biological Oceanography
Paul R. Moorcroft, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Martin A. Nowak, Professor of Mathematics and of Biology (on leave fall term)
Bence P. Olveczky, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences
Donald H. Pfister, Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany and Curator of the Farlow Library and Herbarium (on leave 2014-15)
Naomi E. Pierce, Sidney A. and John H. Hessel Professor of Biology and Curator of Lepidoptera
Stephanie E. Pierce, Assistant Professor in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology; Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology
Anne E. Pringle, Visiting Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Andrew Richardson, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Pardis Sabeti, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Robert M. Woollacott, Professor of Biology and Curator of Marine Invertebrates in the Museum of Comparative Zoology
Yun Zhang, Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Other Faculty Offering Instruction in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Affiliates of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Arthur L. Lage, Associate Professor of Surgery (Medical School)
Daniel E. Lieberman, Edwin M. Lerner II Professor of Biological Sciences, Harvard College Professor
Maryellen Ruvolo, Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard College Professor

Primarily for Undergraduates

OEB 10. Foundations of Biological Diversity
Catalog Number: 7967
Brian D. Farrell, Elena M. Kramer, and Andrew Richardson
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 12, and two hours of laboratory/discussion section weekly, including field trips to marine and forest environments. EXAM GROUP: 11
An integrated approach to the diversity of life, emphasizing how chemical, physical, genetic, ecological and geologic processes contribute to the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. Topics to be covered include the evolution of metabolic pathways, multicellularity and structural complexity; causes and consequences of differences in diversity over space and time; the role of species interactions (including symbioses) as an evolutionary force; and the evolution of humans and their impact on the environment.
Note: Knowledge of introductory molecular, cellular biology, and genetics is recommended. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of Living Systems.

OEB 50. Genetics and Genomics
Catalog Number: 72331
Kirsten Bomblies and Daniel L. Hartl
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 11:30–1. EXAM GROUP: 15
Fundamental concepts in genetics and genomics forming a critical foundation for biology approached from two perspectives: (1) as a body of knowledge pertaining to genetic transmission, function, mutation, and evolution in eukaryotes and prokaryotes; and (2) as an experimental approach providing a toolkit for the study of biological processes such as development and behavior. Topics include structure, function, transmission, linkage, mutation, and manipulation of genes; genetic approaches in experimental studies of biological processes; and analysis of genomes in individuals and populations. Related ethical issues also discussed include genetically modified organisms, gene therapy, genetic testing, personalized medicine, and genetic privacy.

OEB 51. Biology and Evolution of Invertebrate Animals
Catalog Number: 7873 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Gonzalo Giribet and Cassandra G. Extavour
Half course (spring term). Lectures Tu., Th., 10-11:30; laboratory on Wednesdays with hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Introduction to invertebrate diversity, will cover the development, adult anatomy, biology and evolutionary relationships of the main animal phyla including sponges, mollusks, annelids and arthropods among others. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the broad diversity of animal forms and their adaptations to different ecosystems and how these phenomena shape animal evolution. Lectures will be complemented with a mandatory weekly lab and a field trip to different areas of outstanding marine diversity in the Caribbean.
Note: Field trip to the Caribbean for research during spring break.
Prerequisite: LS1b, OEB 10, OEB 53 or permission of instructor required.

OEB 52. Biology of Plants
Catalog Number: 1343
Elena M. Kramer
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30, one afternoon laboratory per week, plus occasional field trips. EXAM GROUP: 12
Introduction to the structure, diversity, and physiology of plants with an emphasis on evolutionary relationships and adaptations to life on land. Topics include growth, resource acquisition, interactions with other organisms (i.e., fungi, bacteria, insects), reproduction, and survival in extreme environments. Laboratory sessions provide an overview of plant and diversity and an introduction to basic physiological processes.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of Living Systems.

OEB 53. Evolutionary Biology
Catalog Number: 3342
Andrew J. Berry and James Mallet
Half course (spring term). M., W., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 8
The course covers micro- and macro-evolution, ranging in its focus from population genetics through molecular evolution to the grand patterns of the fossil record. Topics emphasized include both natural and sexual selection, the ecological context of adaptation, genomic and developmental mechanisms of evolutionary innovation, speciation, phylogenetics, and evolutionary approaches to human problems.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1b or permission of instructor.

OEB 54. Biology of the Fungi
Catalog Number: 9326
Instructor to be determined
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1-2:30, and a weekly laboratory on Tu., 2:30 -5. EXAM GROUP: 8
This course explores the fascinating diversity of the kingdom fungi, including evolution, ecology and morphology. All of the major groups of fungi, from smuts to molds, will be included. Students use a variety of techniques to learn about these organisms and their activities.
Note: There is a weekly laboratory, and several afternoon field trips are required (dates to be announced).
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1a and 1b or permission of instructor.

OEB 55. Ecology: Populations, Communities, and Ecosystems
Catalog Number: 3365
Paul R. Moorcroft
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 10, and a weekly discussion section, and two field trips on either Saturdays or Sundays during mid-April to early-May. EXAM GROUP: 5
This course examines the relationships of organisms to their environment at the individual, population, and community level. The course covers topics in both pure and applied ecology including: adaptations to the physical environment, population dynamics, competition, predator-prey interactions, community ecology, ecosystem structure, stability, and function, the ecology of infectious diseases, and natural resource management.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1a or 1b.

OEB 56. Geobiology and the History of Life
Catalog Number: 22846
David T. Johnston and Andrew H. Knoll
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 10, and a weekly three-hour lab to be arranged, and one field trip. EXAM GROUP: 5
Within our solar system, Earth is distinguished as the planet with life. Life was born of planetary processes, has been sustained for some four billion years by planetary processes, and through time has emerged as a set of planetary processes that is important in its own right. In this course we will investigate the ways that Earth and life interact, focusing in particular on the biogeochemical cycles of major elements. This will provide a framework for interpreting the history of life reconstructed from fossils and phylogeny.
Note: OEB 56 is also offered as EPS 56. Students may not take both OEB 56 and EPS 56 for credit.
Prerequisite: EPS 21, 22, or Life Sciences 1b; or permission of instructor.

OEB 57. Animal Behavior
Catalog Number: 2539
Naomi E. Pierce and Bence P. Olveczky
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10; Guest lectures and film screenings W., at 7:30 pm; one hour discussion section weekly. EXAM GROUP: 12
A review of the behavior of animals under natural conditions, with emphasis on both mechanistic and evolutionary approaches. Topics include classical ethology; behavioral endocrinology; behavioral genetics; learning and memory; communication; orientation, migration and biological rhythms; optimal foraging; evolutionary stable strategies; sexual selection; parental investment and mating systems; selfishness, altruism, and reciprocity; and sociality in vertebrates and invertebrates.

OEB 59. Plants and Human Affairs
Catalog Number: 5281
Charles C. Davis
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 5
An introduction to the uses of plants by humans. Topics include the form, structure and genetics of plants related to their use as sources of food, shelter, fiber, flavors, beverages, drugs, and medicines. Plant structure and reproduction are studied in lecture and laboratory with a particular focus on relationships between the plant’s structural, chemical, or physiological attributes and the utility plant.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or permission of the instructor.

OEB 91r. Supervised Reading
Catalog Number: 6374
David A. Haig and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Supervised reading on topics not covered by regular courses. For OEB concentrators, work may be supervised by faculty in other departments, provided it is co-sponsored by an OEB faculty member. For non-concentrators, work must be directed by an OEB faculty member. Students must submit a registration request to the OEB Undergraduate Office before enrollment. Students cannot take OEB 91r and 99r simultaneously with the same director.

*OEB 99r. Supervised Research
Catalog Number: 7744
David A. Haig and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Course taken in one or more semesters to obtain credit for independent research, including research toward a senior thesis. Work should be directed by an OEB faculty member or have an OEB faculty sponsor. All students must submit registration materials for OEB 99r at the time of enrollment.
Note: Laboratory safety session required.

For Undergraduate and Graduates

[OEB 103. Plant Systematics and Evolution]
Catalog Number: 8704
Charles C. Davis
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30, and a four hour lab on Fridays.
An introduction to the diversity and evolution of vascular plants. The course focuses mainly on flowering plants because of their dominant role on the earth, but lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms are studied as well. A phylogeny of vascular plants provides the framework for their evolution and diversification. Related subjects, including plant habitats, biogeography, phylogenetics, herbaria, nomenclature, and pollination biology are also presented in lecture and laboratory.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. There are two midterms, a final, and frequent lab quizzes.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or permission of instructor.

[OEB 105. Neurobiology of Motor Control]
Catalog Number: 1519
Bence P. Olveczky
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30.
This course explores the functional organization and anatomy of motor circuits in the brain and how they control movements, including simple reflex movements, rhythmic movements, and more complex sequences of learned movements.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: MCB 80 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

[OEB 106. Plant Development and Differentiation]
Catalog Number: 4559
Elena M. Kramer and Pamela Diggle
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30.
A comprehensive lecture course on the developmental biology of plants from fertilization through all phases of vegetative and reproductive growth. Material includes both morphological and genetic studies. Although the main focus of the course is angiosperms, examples are drawn from other lineages of land plants as well. Additional topics include control of cell division and elongation, signal transduction, and hormone response.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1b and OEB 52 (formerly OEB 124) or permission of the instructor.

[OEB 107. Evolution of Plant Life in Geologic Time]
Catalog Number: 1318 Enrollment: OEB 107 is also offered as EPS 107. Students may not take both OEB 107 and EPS 107 for credit.
Andrew H. Knoll
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10, and a weekly 2-hour lab to be arranged.
Origin, evolution, dispersal, paleoecology, and geologic history of the major groups of the plant kingdom. Laboratory study of representative groups, living and fossil.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or permission of instructor.

OEB 114. Vertebrate Viviparity
Catalog Number: 4953
David A. Haig
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 18
Viviparity has evolved many times in vertebrate phylogeny. The course reviews the diversity of parental care in vertebrates and explores the selective forces that have favored the evolution of live-bearing. The evidence for intergenerational conflicts is considered.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1b or permission of instructor.

[OEB 115. Evolutionary Developmental Biology in Animals]
Catalog Number: 9892
Arkhat Abzhanov
Half course (fall term). M., 2–4.
A lecture course in evolutionary developmental biology. Main principles and mechanisms of development as illustrated on both invertebrate and vertebrate animal model systems. In this course we will discuss how animal embryos develop adult body plans on cellular and molecular level. Particular emphasis will be placed on how knowledge of developmental biology helps us understand major evolutionary transitions and the origin of innovation in animal evolution.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1a (or LPS A) and 1b, or permission of instructor. OEB 10, MCB 52, and MCB 54 are recommended but not required. Open to students from any concentration.

[OEB 117. The Mathematics of Evolution]
Catalog Number: 11415
Michael Manish Desai
Half course (fall term). M., W., 1–2:30.
The quantitative basis of evolutionary theory: models of natural selection, mutations, and genetic drift at a single locus; multilocus problems in evolutionary dynamics including topics such as Muller’s ratchet, hitchhiking, quasi-linkage equilibrium and strong linkage approximations; evolution of recombination and mutation rates and other modifiers of evolvability; an introduction to genealogical approaches; inference in population genetics; evolution in structured populations; and interactions between ecology, epidemiology, and evolution.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Mathematics through calculus and familiarity with differential equations and probability.

OEB 118. Biological Oceanography
Catalog Number: 7752
James J. McCarthy
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
The ocean as an ecological system, with focus on environmental-organismal interactions that regulate plankton production and transfer to higher trophic levels. Specific topics include bloom events, the limits to fish harvest, and the effects of climate change on ocean systems. Plankton demonstrations and optional coastal research vessel day trip.
Note: For biology and other natural science concentrators.
Prerequisite: OEB 10, Physical Sciences 1 or permission of instructor.

OEB 119. Deep Sea Biology
Catalog Number: 1397
Peter R. Girguis
Half course (spring term). M., W., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 8
The oceans contain 97% of Earth’s water, and host the most disparate ecosystems on the planet. This course provides an introduction to deep ocean habitats, macrofauna and microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on the physiological adaptations of organisms to their environment, as well the role of microbes in mediating oceanic biogeochemical cycles.

OEB 120. Plants and Climate - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 19816
N. Michele Holbrook
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
How plants are affected by climate - both spatially across the globe and as climate changes over time - is relevant to understanding patterns of plant evolution, ecosystem structure, and the impact of humans on our planet. This course examines how variation in rainfall, temperature, atmospheric humidity and CO2 affects the growth and productivity of plants. Topics include photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and vascular transport; experimental approaches and measurement techniques will also be covered.
Prerequisite: OEB 52, 55 or OEB 10 (or permission of the instructor).

*OEB 121a. Research in Comparative Biomechanics: Seminar
Catalog Number: 4049
Andrew A. Biewener, Stacey A. Combes, George V. Lauder, and Anna G. Warrener
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Introduces students to experimental techniques used to investigate the structure and physiology of animals. Each instructor offers research projects that are undertaken in their laboratory (limit 5 students per instructor). Students meet to introduce their project, discuss their work and progress, and to present their final results. An extensive commitment of time in the laboratory is required. Grades are based on the work completed, the oral presentation, and a short research paper.
Note: Laboratory safety session required.

OEB 123. Biology of Symbiosis
Catalog Number: 0508
Colleen M. Cavanaugh
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
An examination of the major aspects of microbial endosymbiosis with emphasis on mutualisms, although some parasitic interactions are covered. Topics include origins of the eukaryotic cell, specificity and recognition of partners, distribution and diversity of associations, and coevolution of host and symbiont. The course covers symbiotic interactions among bacteria and archaea with protists, fungi, plants, and animals, including the human microbiome.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1b, OEB 10, and MCB 52 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

[OEB 125. Molecular Ecology and Evolution]
Catalog Number: 2691
Scott V. Edwards
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30–1.
A survey of theory and applications of DNA technologies to the study of evolutionary, ecological and behavioral processes in natural populations. Topics to be covered will span a variety of hierarchical levels, timescales, and taxonomic groups, and will include the evolution of genes, genomes and proteins; the neutral theory of molecular evolution and molecular clocks; population genomics and phylogenetic principles of speciation and phylogeography; metagenomics of microbial communities; relatedness and behavioral ecology; molecular ecology of infectious disease; and conservation genetics.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Weekly computer laboratories will introduce the use of the internet and computational software in DNA sequence alignment and phylogenetic and population genetic analysis.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1b, OEB 10, OEB 53 or MCB 52.

[OEB 130. Biology of Fishes]
Catalog Number: 4624
George V. Lauder
Half course (spring term). M., W., 11–12:30.
Fishes inhabit diverse aquatic environments including deep seas, intertidal zones, coral reefs, polar waters, the vast Amazonian basin, and great East African lakes. A single fish species may occupy diverse environments through extraordinary long distance horizontal and vertical migrations. To explore this unparalleled diversity, the course emphasizes bridging traditional academic boundaries with integrative analyses of the biology underlying rapid evolutionary radiations and stasis.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

OEB 131. Neuroethology
Catalog Number: 31902 Enrollment: Limited to 16.
Benjamin Lovegren de Bivort
Half course (spring term). F., at 2 and a weekly lab to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 18
The evolutionary success of animals depends on how effectively they respond to external events with useful behaviors. Neuroethology is the study of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying adaptive behaviors. In this laboratory class we will examine the adaptive behaviors of three organisms: fruit flies, flatworms and cockroaches. By following published experimental protocols, and testing novel student-developed hypotheses, we will explore the transformation of external stimuli to behavioral output, the role of neurotransmitter systems and neuromodulatory states, the effect of genetic mutation and genomic background, and the physiology of locomotion. In culmination, students will develop their own multi-week experimental project.
Prerequisite: MCB 80 or OEB 57 or instructor’s permission

OEB 141. Biogeography
Catalog Number: 85974
Gonzalo Giribet
Half course (spring term). M., W., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 18
Biogeography aims to explain distributions of organisms through historical and ecological factors. This course will focus on the history of biogeographic research, developments in the area of historical biogeography, and on ecological processes that affect distributions of whole clades. Topics include plate tectonics and earth history, vicariance and dispersal, areas of endemism, phylogenetic niche conservatism, latitudinal gradients in species richness, and the theory of island biogeography. Software for biogeographical analysis will be discussed and evaluated.
Prerequisite: Two following courses: Life Sciences 1b, OEB 10, OEB 51, OEB 52, OEB 53, OEB 54, OEB 55, OEB 181, or permission of the instructor.

OEB 145. Genes and Behavior
Catalog Number: 48436
Yun Zhang
Half course (fall term). M., W., 3–4:30. EXAM GROUP: 6
Behavior is inheritable and regulated by genes. This lecture course explores the causal links between the genes encoded in the genome and various behaviors, aiming to provide mechanistic understandings on how gene products control and influence behavioral outputs. The topics of the lectures cover both important findings as well as major research approaches in the field. The behavioral traits in discussion include olfaction, mechanosensation, foraging, circadian rhythm, aggression, courtship, sleep, social recognition, learning and memory, etc. The organisms that we will discuss include invertebrates, vertebrates and humans.
Prerequisite: Life Science 1a.

[OEB 150. Vertebrate Evolution and Development]
Catalog Number: 62937
Arkhat Abzhanov
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30.
A survey of the evolution and development of major groups of vertebrates, integrating the paleontological record of the origin of chordates, diverse fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals with current understanding of the genetic, cellular and developmental mechanisms that underlie these transformations.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Not open to students who have taken OEB 139.

OEB 153. Statistics for Biology
Catalog Number: 49559
Elizabeth M. Wolkovich and John Wakeley
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 5
Introduction to probability and statistics, with dual concern for analytical thinking and data analysis.The fundamentals of R will be covered, then this software environment will be used to analyze data and make statistical inferences. Ecological and genetic data will be the primary focus of applications. Analytical thinking modules will cover the theory of probability, statistical distributions, and the principles of statistical inference. You will will learn how to defend your claims and not be fooled by quantitative arguments.
Note: This is a substantially revised version of this course for 2014-2015. This course is offered every other year.
Prerequisite: Mathematics through Calculus.

*OEB 155r. Biology of Insects
Catalog Number: 2346 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Naomi E. Pierce and Michael R. Canfield
Half course (fall term). W., F., 1:30–3. EXAM GROUP: 1
An introduction to the major groups of insects. The life history, morphology, physiology, and ecology of the main taxa are examined through a combination of lecture, lab, and field exercises. Topics include the phylogeny of terrestrial arthropods with a review of the extant orders, an analysis of abiotic and biotic factors regulating populations, including water balance, temperature, migration, parasitism, mutualism, sociality, insect/plant interactions, medical entomology, and the use of insects in biological control.
Prerequisite: With permission of instructor.

[OEB 157. Global Change Biology]
Catalog Number: 7055
Paul R. Moorcroft and James J. McCarthy
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
This course examines how natural and anthropogenic changes in the earth system are affecting the composition and the functioning of the world’s land and ocean ecosystems. Topics include: the ecological impacts of natural and anthropogenic changes in the earth’s physical environment, and the effects of introduced species, species extinctions, land-use change, agriculture, and fishing.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or OEB 53 and Mathematics 1a required. OEB 55 (formerly BS 55) recommended.

[OEB 167. Herpetology]
Catalog Number: 4070
James Hanken and Jonathan Losos
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1-2:30; Lab: W., 2:30-5:30.
An introduction to the biology of amphibians and reptiles. Lectures and laboratories examine the morphology, systematics, natural history, behavior, ecology, evolutionary relationships, and biogeography of all major taxa.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. The course is planning an optional week-long field trip during spring break.

OEB 168r. Sociobotany
Catalog Number: 5092
David A. Haig
Half course (spring term). F., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 18
A study of the diversity and evolution of plant life cycles, with an emphasis on interactions between the generations. The course will focus on bryophytes.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

[OEB 173. Comparative Biomechanics]
Catalog Number: 9667
Andrew A. Biewener and Stacey A. Combes
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
An exploration of how animals and plants contend with their physical environment, considering their biomaterial properties, structural form, and mechanical interaction with the environment. Through lectures, seminar discussions, and student presentations based on readings, students are introduced to topics related to biomechanical performance.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1b, Physical Science 2 or Physics 11a; Mathematics 21a recommended, or permission of instructor.

[OEB 181. Systematics]
Catalog Number: 5459
Gonzalo Giribet
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30; laboratory on Wednesdays with hours to be arranged.
Theory and practice of systematics, emphasizing issues associated with homology statements and alignments, methods of tree reconstruction, and hypothesis evaluation. The course combines theoretical considerations, paying special attention to algorithmic aspects of phylogenetics, with the use of different computer programs for conducting evolutionary and phylogenetic analyses.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 53, LS1b or permission of instructor required. Familiarity with computers, especially PC platforms.

OEB 185. Genetic Conflict
Catalog Number: 98102
Kirsten Bomblies
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 1
Some genes cheat random inheritance to gain disproportionate representation in progeny. The results for organisms range from beneficial to strongly detrimental; some may even cause extinction. The evolution of selfish elements and their suppressors is a rich drama that unfolds in genomes with important implications for evolution, speciation, human and animal health, and agriculture. This course will explore the mechanisms by which genes or chromosomes cheat, and counterstrategies that evolve to thwart them.

[OEB 190. Biology and Diversity of Birds]
Catalog Number: 3870 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Scott V. Edwards
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30-1, and two hours weekly of specimen laboratory.
An introduction to the biology of birds. Covers the fossil record and theories for avian origins, physiology and anatomy, higher-level systematics and field characters of the ~27 orders, speciation processes, nesting and courtship behavior, vocalizations, mating systems and sexual selection, cooperative breeding, demography and conservation. Optional field trip during spring break. Laboratories will consist of gross anatomy, bird watching excursions in the Cambridge area, field techniques and specimen preparation, and systematic study of avian groups using the collections of the Museum of Comparative Zoology.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or OEB 53 or permission of the instructor.

OEB 191. Physiological and Biochemical Adaptation
Catalog Number: 2314
Peter R. Girguis
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
This course examines how microbes and animals have evolved to maintain function throughout the wide range of extant habitats. Emphasis is on physiological/biochemical evolution in response to environmental conditions, including climate change and life in extreme environments. As the first course in the "genomes to biomes" series, we will examine new approaches to interrogating organismal physiology in nature. Those interested can continue the "genomes to biomes" program via LS 100r.
Note: One lab per week.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or CHEM 27 or permission of the instructor.

[OEB 192. Microbial Evolution]
Catalog Number: 5019
Christopher Marx
Half course (fall term). M., W., 1–2:30.
An examination of the evolution of microbes through an integration of lectures and discussion of primary literature. We will focus on a series of broad questions for which we will draw upon knowledge from both lab-based study of experimental microcosms and comparative studies of natural populations. Notably, students will conduct their own experimental evolution projects using ’digital organisms’.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1a and Life Sciences 1b or equivalent required.

[OEB 194. Laboratory Techniques in Ecological Physiology]
Catalog Number: 19882
Peter R. Girguis and Stacey A. Combes
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
An introduction to laboratory techniques in experimental physiology, this course will utilize a variety of equipment and several model organisms to empirically investigate foundational concepts in physiological and biochemical adaptation. Labs will complement and extend topics discussed in the companion class, OEB191. After demonstrating proficiency with core techniques, students will design independent research projects to explore novel questions in ecological physiology.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in OEB 191, or instructor approval.

Primarily for Graduates

[OEB 209. Oxygen and Life]
Catalog Number: 67224
Andrew H. Knoll and Peter R. Girguis
Half course (fall term). W., 12–2.
In this seminar, we will explore the molecular and physiological interactions between organisms and oxygen, and use these to shed light on the role of oxygen in modulating evolutionary change through Earth history.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: One of the following: OEB 191, EPS 181, EPS 186; or permission of instructors

[*OEB 210. Writing Scientific Papers]
Catalog Number: 37244 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Andrew Richardson
Half course (fall term). M., W., 2:30–4.
You’ve designed your experiment, made your measurements, and analyzed your data. Now what? How do you write a paper that will not only get accepted, but also get cited? This is a hands-on workshop course targeted at graduate students who are ready to write up their first research paper for submission to a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The class will emphasize the idea that your paper should tell a (nonfiction!) story that engages the reader. By the end of the semester you will have a coherent, well-structured, and polished manuscript.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[OEB 212r. Advanced Topics in Plant Physiology]
Catalog Number: 2176
N. Michele Holbrook
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
A critical discussion of current research in plant physiology including measurement techniques, modeling, and experimental approaches.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 120 , OEB 52 or permission of instructor.

[*OEB 214. Biology of Acoustic Communities]
Catalog Number: 2422 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Brian D. Farrell
Half course (spring term). Tu., 11:30–1.
Four principal animal groups (insects, frogs, birds and mammals) sing and call in habitats around the world. We discuss the ecology, evolution and characteristics of such acoustic communities and the hypothesis that their members compete for "bandwidth". We discuss readings on acoustic ecology and evolution, and listen to (and watch, via spectrum analysis) soundscapes from selected tropical and temperate habitats. The capstone will be a fieldtrip to record natural soundscapes.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 10 or permission of the instructor.

OEB 215. Topics in Ecophysiology
Catalog Number: 99294
Stacey A. Combes
Half course (spring term). Tu., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 16
A discussion based course exploring the physiological processes involved in an organism’s interactions with its environment. Readings will focus on adaptation to environmental variability, with an emphasis on responses to climate change and habitat alteration.
Prerequisite: OEB 191 or permission of instructor

OEB 216. Modern Conservation Biology - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 32679 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Elizabeth M. Wolkovich
Half course (fall term). W., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 7
Readings (mainly from the scientific literature) and discussion of what defines and theoretically underpins the field of conservation biology - though discussion is on the current version of the field, readings will span its development over the last 50+ years.
Prerequisite: OEB 55 or permission of instructor

*OEB 220r. Writing fellowship and grant proposals for the biological sciences
Catalog Number: 15907
Stacey A. Combes
Half course (fall term). Th., 11:30–1:30. EXAM GROUP: 15
This course will prepare graduate students to write NSF-style proposals through in-class exercises, group analysis of writing samples, talks by former NSF panel members, and writing assignments geared towards meeting November proposal deadlines.

OEB 221. Microbial Diversity
Catalog Number: 1234
Colleen M. Cavanaugh
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1:30–4. EXAM GROUP: 8
Examines the remarkable diversity of the microbial world, "the unseen majority". Physiological, genetic, ecological, and evolutionary characteristics of Bacteria and Archaea are discussed, as well as the relation of phenotype to phylogeny. The course has strong links to fields ranging from geochemistry and climate change to the human microbiome, and will include discussions with experts in microbial biodiversity.
Prerequisite: Background in microbial science and/or permission of instructor.

OEB 223. Topics in Neurogenetics
Catalog Number: 1434
Yun Zhang
Half course (spring term). W., 2–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 18
We will discuss current literatures related to genetic effects on neural functions, including: (1) mental illness; (2) neurodegenerative diseases; (3) various behaviors; (4) learning and memory.
Note: The course is primarily planned for new graduate students, but it is also open to interested senior undergraduates who have taken OEB 57 (formerly BS 57) or MCB 80 and obtained permission from the instructor.

*OEB 230. Genomics of Species Evolution
Catalog Number: 0122
James Mallet
Half course (spring term). Th., 1:30–3:30. EXAM GROUP: 1
This discussion-based course will survey modern ideas about speciation, and how they have changed as a result of genomic approaches. As well as readings and discussions in class, the course will utilize live online video sessions with major players in the field of evolutionary genomics and speciation.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Instructor’s permission. It is recommended that a basic evolution or population genetics course will have been taken (e.g. OEB 53 or OEB 242).

[*OEB 231. Adaptation]
Catalog Number: 95671
Hopi E. Hoekstra
Half course (spring term). M., 2–4.
This discussion-based course covers the latest advances in the study of adaptation with a focus on controversial issues and integrative approaches. The course combines readings from recent primary literature with discussion with experts via video conferencing.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

*OEB 234. Topics in Marine Biology
Catalog Number: 4637
Robert M. Woollacott
Half course (spring term). W., 2:30–5. EXAM GROUP: 18
Human impacts on marine life and ecosystems of the sea.
Note: Weekly class meeting including lectures, class presentations, several laboratories, and one field trip through the course of term.

OEB 242. Population Genetics
Catalog Number: 0903
Daniel L. Hartl and Michael Manish Desai
Half course (spring term). W., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 18
Mathematical theory, experimental data, and history of ideas in the field, including analytical methods to study genetic variation with applications to evolution, demographic history, agriculture, health and disease. Includes lectures, problem sets, and student presentations.
Prerequisite: LS1b or permission of the instructor.

*OEB 251. Introduction to Vertebrate Surgery
Catalog Number: 2075 Enrollment: Limited to 16.
Arthur L. Lage (Medical School)
Half course (fall term). W., 1-3, and a weekly lab, W., 3-6. EXAM GROUP: 1
Teaches the basic principles of aseptic surgery with emphasis on practicality. Students learn basic "open” surgery as well as newer high-tech videoscopic minimally invasive technique, obtaining hands-on experience in scrubbing, gowning, and sterile technique while serving as anesthetist and surgeon.
Note: Intended for the student interested in the application of surgical technique in higher studies in biology and related disciplines.
Prerequisite: Comparative anatomy, Life Sciences 2 (or OEB 102), or equivalent course.

[OEB 252. Coalescent Theory]
Catalog Number: 0118
John Wakeley
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 9.
The mathematics and computation of ancestral inference in population genetics. Theory relates observable genetic data to factors of evolution such as mutation, genetic drift, migration, natural selection, and population structure.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 242 or permission of instructor: calculus and statistics or probability.

OEB 253r. Evolutionary Genetics Seminar
Catalog Number: 8104
John Wakeley
Half course (spring term). W., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 14
Readings and discussion of primary literature in population and evolutionary genetics.
Prerequisite: OEB 152 or permission of instructor.

[OEB 255. Nature and Regulation of Marine Ecosystems ]
Catalog Number: 7753
James J. McCarthy and guest lecturers
Half course (spring term). F., 1–3.
A presentation of topics that are of current interest in marine ecosystems. Emphasis on identification and quantification of biological and environmental factors important in the regulation of community structure.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 118 or OEB 157.

[OEB 258. Adaptive Radiation and Macroevolution]
Catalog Number: 68083
Jonathan Losos
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2:30–5.
A critical examination of the concepts and methods related to the study of adaptive radiation and macroevolutionary diversification. Evolutionary consequences will be studied from both empirical and theoretical perspectives. Emphasis will be placed on current controversies on applying modern conceptual and analytical approaches to long-standing questions.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[OEB 261r. Developmental Mechanisms of Evolutionary Change]
Catalog Number: 8451
Arkhat Abzhanov
Half course (spring term). F., 2–4.
This lecture-seminar course will consider how mechanisms of animal developmental genetics help to explain the scope and patterns of animal diversity. Particular emphasis is placed on major evolutionary transitions and the origin of innovations.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: LS 1A and LS 1B or by permission of the instructor.

[OEB 264. Sustainability Science: Interactions between Human and Environmental Systems]
Catalog Number: 16239
William C. Clark (Kennedy School) and N. Michele Holbrook
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1:10–2:30.
A research seminar on how core theories of sustainability science provide a framework for improving the well-being of present and future generations in ways that conserve the planet’s life support systems. The seminar will engage in a critical discussion of the underlying theory of the field and evaluate case studies of efforts to manage particular coupled human-environment systems.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16. Offered jointly with the Kennedy School as IGA-944.

[OEB 268r. Topics in Plant Developmental Genetics]
Catalog Number: 5020
Pamela Diggle
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1-2:30, with Lab on Thursdays, 3-5.
This lecture/laboratory covers plant anatomy and development, including the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs and their developmental origin at the shoot apical meristem. Techniques of histology and microscopy also are covered.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 106 and Life Sciences 1b or BS 50, or MCB 52 or permission of instructor.

[OEB 275r. Phylogenomics, Comparative Genomics and Adaptation]
Catalog Number: 5004
Scott V. Edwards
Half course (fall term). Th., 2-4, and occasional computer labs.
This semester we will explore through readings of the recent literature the ways in which comparative genomics can inform phylogeny and genomic adaptation. In addition to surveying recent methods for harnessing thousands of loci for phylogenetic reconstruction, we will also study how comparing genomes of higher clades can reveal signatures of adaptation, particularly in the noncoding portion of the genome.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: OEB 53, OEB 181, OEB 125 or equivalent.

[*OEB 277r. In Sickness and in Health: Topics in Symbiosis]
Catalog Number: 37264
Colleen M. Cavanaugh
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3.
Critical review and discussion of current issues in symbiosis. Emphasis is on microbe-eukaryote symbioses ranging from mutualistic to pathogenic associations. In 2011 the course will focus on the human microbiome and topics selected by faculty and students.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: Life Sciences 1a, 1b or equivalent, microbial science, or permission of instructor.

[*OEB 278. Ecological Genetics]
Catalog Number: 0732
Anne E. Pringle
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3:30.
Ecological genetics explores the adjustments and adaptations of wild populations to their environment. We will use the primary literature to explore how diverse organisms are actually evolving in nature, and challenge the traditional divide between evolution and ecology.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

[OEB 279. Microbial Metabolic Systems]
Catalog Number: 79668
Christopher Marx
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course covers microbial metabolism, with a focus on quantitative analyses and modeling. Rather than a laundry list of what different microbes can do, we will focus on thinking about metabolism from the more generic point of view of systems of enzymes, concentrations, and fluxes. We will cover empirical, computational, and theoretical approaches, including concepts such as Flux Balance Analysis and Metabolic Control, and focusing upon the selective pressures that operate on metabolism.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.
Prerequisite: LS1A or equivalent

[OEB 282. Genomics and Evolution of Infectious Disease (Graduate Seminar in General Education)]
Catalog Number: 43026
Pardis Sabeti
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4.
Infectious diseases rapidly evolve to evade our immune systems, drugs, and vaccines, to remain agents of great morbidity and mortality. We will investigate the genome evolution of these pathogens and our intervention strategies for them past and present, with case examples from avian flu, malaria, TB, lassa fever and more. The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

*OEB 290. Microbial Sciences: Chemistry, Ecology and Evolution
Catalog Number: 7185 Enrollment: Limited to 30.
Michael S. Gilmore (Medical School)
Half course (spring term). F., at 8:30, F., 9:45–11:45. EXAM GROUP: 10
This is an interdisciplinary graduate-level and advanced undergraduate-level course in which students explore topics in molecular microbiology, microbial diversity, and microbially-mediated geochemistry in depth. This course will be taught by faculty from the Microbial Sciences Initiative. Topics include the origins of life, biogeochemical cycles, microbial diversity, and ecology.
Note: Also offered as Microbiology 210.
Prerequisite: For advanced undergraduates, Life Sciences 1a and 1b are required, or permission of instructor. MCB 52 is recommended.

[*OEB 296. Conservation History, Values, and Law]
Catalog Number: 17821
Jonathan Losos and David R. Foster
Half course (fall term). W., 3–5.
Designed for students in ecology and evolution. Through readings and discussion we examine the history of the conservation/preservationist movements. We focus on how various constituencies value nature, and the legal system for protecting nature.
Note: Expected to be given in 2015–16.

*OEB 299r. Forest Practice and Research
Catalog Number: 6128
David R. Foster
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Field and laboratory research into the history, biology, ecology, culture, and economic problems of local, regional, and world forests. Individual research projects.
Note: Seminars, conferences, field, and laboratory work at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts.

Cross-listed Courses

Earth and Planetary Sciences 181. Historical Geobiology
*Environmental Science and Public Policy 90e. Conservation Biology
Human Evolutionary Biology 1420. Human Evolutionary Anatomy
*Human Evolutionary Biology 1463. Molecular Evolution of the Primates
Life Sciences 1b. An Integrated Introduction to the Life Sciences: Genetics, Genomics, and Evolution
Life Sciences 2. Evolutionary Human Physiology and Anatomy
[Mathematics 153. Mathematical Biology-Evolutionary Dynamics]
Mathematics 243. Evolutionary Dynamics
[*MCB 162. Major Advances in Understanding Heredity and Evolution]
MCB 291. Genetics, Genomics and Evolutionary Biology

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*OEB 303. Theoretical Population Genetics
Catalog Number: 4248
John Wakeley 5680

*OEB 304. Mycology
Catalog Number: 4702
Donald H. Pfister 4344 (on leave 2014-15)

*OEB 305. The Fundamental Interconnectedness of All Things
Catalog Number: 3647
David A. Haig 1629

*OEB 307. Biomechanics, Physiology and Musculoskeletal Biology
Catalog Number: 2831
Andrew A. Biewener 1446 (on leave fall term)

*OEB 308. Evolution of Floral Developmental Mechanisms
Catalog Number: 5535
Elena M. Kramer 3791

*OEB 310. Metazoan Systematics
Catalog Number: 3975
Gonzalo Giribet 3854

*OEB 311. Ecosystem Ecology
Catalog Number: 6416
Paul R. Moorcroft 4174

*OEB 320. Biomechanics and Evolution of Vertebrates
Catalog Number: 8915
George V. Lauder 2375

*OEB 323. Advanced Vertebrate Anatomy
Catalog Number: 8188
Instructor to be determined

*OEB 324. Molecular Evolution
Catalog Number: 2356
Daniel L. Hartl 3278

*OEB 325. Marine Biology
Catalog Number: 4643
Robert M. Woollacott 4135

*OEB 334. Behavioral Ecology
Catalog Number: 8279
Naomi E. Pierce 2889

*OEB 335. Ichthyology and Functional Anatomy of Fishes
Catalog Number: 4640
Instructor to be determined

*OEB 339. Whole-Plant Physiology
Catalog Number: 5214
N. Michele Holbrook 1220

*OEB 341. Coevolution
Catalog Number: 2998
Brian D. Farrell 1985

*OEB 343. Microbial Ecology and Symbiosis
Catalog Number: 1288
Colleen M. Cavanaugh 2538

*OEB 345. Biological Oceanography
Catalog Number: 4676
James J. McCarthy 4343

*OEB 355. Evolutionary Developmental Biology
Catalog Number: 9192
James Hanken 2719 (on leave fall term)

*OEB 357. Population Biology and Mathematical Biology
Catalog Number: 5392
William H. Bossert 1049

*OEB 359. Paleobotany
Catalog Number: 0248
Andrew H. Knoll 7425

*OEB 361. Somatic Evolution of Cancer
Catalog Number: 5791
Martin A. Nowak 4568 (on leave fall term)

*OEB 362. Research in Molecular Evolution
Catalog Number: 2367
Scott V. Edwards 5049

*OEB 363. Plant Diversity and Evolution
Catalog Number: 0001
Charles C. Davis 5263

*OEB 364. Ecological Physiology of Microbes
Catalog Number: 0002
Peter R. Girguis 5264

*OEB 365. Evolution of Microbes
Catalog Number: 0003
Christopher J. Marx 5265

*OEB 366. Evolution, Ecology, and Fungi
Catalog Number: 0004
Anne Pringle 5266

*OEB 367. Evolutionary and Ecological Diversity
Catalog Number: 0420
Jonathan Losos 5449 (on leave 2014-15)

*OEB 368. Oral Developmental Biology
Catalog Number: 7087
Arkhat Abzhanov 5597

*OEB 369. Molecular Genetics of Neuroscience
Catalog Number: 5175
Yun Zhang 5780

*OEB 370. Mammalian Evolutionary Genetics
Catalog Number: 3072
Hopi E. Hoekstra 5814

*OEB 371. Comparative and Evolutionary Invertebrate Developmental Biology
Catalog Number: 7188
Cassandra G. Extavour 6035

*OEB 372. Neural Basis of Learned Motor Behaviors
Catalog Number: 8438
Bence P. Olveczky 6003

*OEB 373. Plant Population Biology
Catalog Number: 34452
Kirsten Bomblies 6337

*OEB 375. Evolutionary Dynamics and Population Genetics
Catalog Number: 60662
Michael Manish Desai 6547

*OEB 376. Insect Biomechanics and Behavioral Ecology
Catalog Number: 75769
Stacey A. Combes 6030

*OEB 378. Terrestrial Ecology
Catalog Number: 24247
Andrew Richardson 6562

*OEB 380. Neurobiological Basis of Behavior
Catalog Number: 50426
Benjamin Lovegren de Bivort 7305

*OEB 385. Natural Selection in Humans and Pathogens
Catalog Number: 39354
Pardis Sabeti 6022

*OEB 386. Organismic and Evolutionary Plant Biology
Catalog Number: 55867
William Friedman 6896

*OEB 399. Topics in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Catalog Number: 0764
Jonathan Losos 5449 (on leave 2014-15)
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). W., 5-7 pm.
Presents the research interests and experiences of scientists in organismic and evolutionary biology. Specific topics treated vary from year to year.
Note: Required of all first-year graduate students in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology.